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Task •In a 4-5 page paper (absolute minimum 3.5 pages, absolute maximum 5.5 pages), argue how Bicycle Thieves, directed by Vittorio De Sica, or The Battle of Algiers, directed by Gillo Pontecorvo, represents a particular, narrowly-defined issue or phenomenon by using evidence from one or two film scenes. Your thesis should be original (entirely your idea), and it should indicate not only the issue or phenomenon in question but also the film’s point of view about that issue or phenomenon. To support your original, specific, focused (no lists!), and unobvious thesis, raise evidence from one or two film scenes.Your thesis ought to be insightful enough to give you enough legitimate analysis to do. Do not pad your paper with bullshit! Objectives Practice engaging with a source’s ideas and using them to further your own intellectual ends To defend a reasoned judgment To quote and paraphrase accurately and gracefully Criteria for Evaluation Complete: Does the paper include all the necessary parts of the assignment? (thesis, summary of the film/scenes, focusing on a few key details, two portable concepts used in service of your thesis, conclusion, etc.)? •Accurate: Do your paraphrases and analyses faithfully represent the source material (both the film and the essays)? Brief: Does the paper use language precisely and economically to say as much as possible in the allotted space? •Independent: Would the paper make sense to readers who have not read the essays and seen the movies? Do you define key terms, if necessary? •Clarity and Design: Is the paper well-written, easy to understand, and easy to follow? Is it focused on your thesis? Does it have an effective structure and an appropriate style? Are sources properly documented? Are transitions used well? Is it organized and coherent? Editing Skills: Is the paper free of grammatical and mechanical errors? Grade Range •A – Model paper. Up to a few minor errors and no major errors. •B – A few minor errors and perhaps one or two major errors counterbalanced by better than average execution. •C – Complete assignment. One or more major errors accompanied by many minor errors. On balance, however, the paper does fair work satisfying the requirements. A “C” paper is a successful paper. •D – A medley of major and minor errors. Usually an incomplete assignment. Often times “D” papers demonstrate reading and assignment comprehension issues or are a product of student sloppiness and laziness. •F – Failure. Major Errors: Result in the loss of anywhere between 8-30 points, depending on the severity. These errors usually involve issues related to the thesis, accuracy and misrepresentation, independence, citation, evidence (analysis/portable concept execution), introduction/conclusion, and completion. Minor Errors: Result in the loss of anywhere between 1-7 points, depending on the severity. These errors usually involve issues related to grammar and editing, organization, clarity, and neutrality. However, sometimes a problem with the thesis, accuracy, independence, evidence (analysis/portable concept execution), introduction/conclusion, or citation is insignificant enough to fall under this category. Keep in mind that minor errors can snowball and cause major errors. For instance, minor errors in organization could conceivably make a paper very difficult to follow overall, giving rise to a work that lacks independence.
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Paper 2: Film Analysis
Total Points: 200
Description: A paper examining how a film represents a particular issue or phenomenon
Format: MLA format, double-spaced, 12-point Times New Roman Font
Draft Paragraphs Due Date: Monday, March 25th
Full First Draft Due Date: Wednesday, March 27th
Final Draft Due Date: Monday, April 1st
Task
• In a 4-5 page paper (absolute minimum 3.5 pages, absolute maximum 5.5 pages), argue
how Bicycle Thieves, directed by Vittorio De Sica, or The Battle of Algiers, directed by
Gillo Pontecorvo, represents a particular, narrowly-defined issue or phenomenon by using
evidence from one or two film scenes. Your thesis should be original (entirely your idea),
and it should indicate not only the issue or phenomenon in question but also the film’s
point of view about that issue or phenomenon.
o To support your original, specific, focused (no lists!), and unobvious thesis, raise
evidence from one or two film scenes.Your thesis ought to be insightful enough to
give you enough legitimate analysis to do. Do not pad your paper with bullshit!
o You may wish to consult the tools for visual analysis powerpoint on Canvas for
help in zeroing in on specific, concrete details for you to examine. Focus your
argument on one or two important scenes (roughly 1-4 minute segments).
o Begin with an introduction that engages the reader and uses one or more of the
introductory strategies we discussed in class. Remember that your introduction
serves as an introduction to your argument and not to the film (do not summarize
the film in the opening paragraph). End the introduction with your thesis.
o Apply two analytically useful portable concepts (with specific definitional content!)
picked from the following sources: Emerson (both Power and Circles are fair
game), Baldwin, Machiavelli, and Kropotkin. You may not use two concepts from
the same source. You must use these concepts in service to your thesis to enhance
the reader’s understanding of the film. Remember the five steps!
o Remaining focused on the meaning of very few specific details will help you avoid
simple plot description. Remember the spirit of “10 on 1”—do more with less—by
applying your portable concepts to very few representative pieces of evidence from
each film scene. Step 4 and 5 application should represent the majority of your analysis paragraphs. Be sure to link evidence and claims with analysis (your reasoning),
and be sure to explain in thorough terms how the results of your P.C. applications
support your thesis.
o Introduce the film as a whole briefly. Summarize the film scene(s) in more detail
(CABIN summaries) for independence.
o Use transitions and topic sentences as necessary to express how points are related to
one another.
o Cite all paraphrases and quotes from the essays with page number citations.
o You need not provide in-text citations for the movie as long as you have made clear
the film’s director in the relevant paragraph(s). For example: “In Bicycle Thieves
directed by Vittorio De Sica…” or “De Sica’s film…” attributes authorship of the
film to De Sica.
o
o
Conclude the essay with a conclusion that avoids repetition. Answer “So what?,”
etc. I will be paying very close attention to the quality of the introductions and
conclusions submitted in Papers 2 and 3. Be sure to show respect for these
absolutely essential paragraphs. Give me your best work!
Provide an MLA formatted work cited page (treat Canvas as a database from which
you sourced the essays). Please staple the assignment.
Objectives
• Practice engaging with a source’s ideas and using them to further your own intellectual
ends
• To defend a reasoned judgment
• To quote and paraphrase accurately and gracefully
Criteria for Evaluation
• Complete: Does the paper include all the necessary parts of the assignment? (thesis, summary of the film/scenes, focusing on a few key details, two portable concepts used in service of your thesis, conclusion, etc.)?
• Accurate: Do your paraphrases and analyses faithfully represent the source material (both
the film and the essays)?
• Brief: Does the paper use language precisely and economically to say as much as possible
in the allotted space?
• Independent: Would the paper make sense to readers who have not read the essays and
seen the movies? Do you define key terms, if necessary?
• Clarity and Design: Is the paper well-written, easy to understand, and easy to follow? Is it
focused on your thesis? Does it have an effective structure and an appropriate style? Are
sources properly documented? Are transitions used well? Is it organized and coherent?
• Editing Skills: Is the paper free of grammatical and mechanical errors?
Grade Range





A – Model paper. Up to a few minor errors and no major errors.
B – A few minor errors and perhaps one or two major errors counterbalanced by better than
average execution.
C – Complete assignment. One or more major errors accompanied by many minor errors.
On balance, however, the paper does fair work satisfying the requirements. A “C” paper is
a successful paper.
D – A medley of major and minor errors. Usually an incomplete assignment. Often times
“D” papers demonstrate reading and assignment comprehension issues or are a product of
student sloppiness and laziness.
F – Failure.
Major Errors: Result in the loss of anywhere between 8-30 points, depending on the severity.
These errors usually involve issues related to the thesis, accuracy and misrepresentation, independence, citation, evidence (analysis/portable concept execution), introduction/conclusion, and completion.
Minor Errors: Result in the loss of anywhere between 1-7 points, depending on the severity.
These errors usually involve issues related to grammar and editing, organization, clarity, and neutrality. However, sometimes a problem with the thesis, accuracy, independence, evidence (analysis/portable concept execution), introduction/conclusion, or citation is insignificant enough to fall
under this category.
Keep in mind that minor errors can snowball and cause major errors. For instance, minor errors in
organization could conceivably make a paper very difficult to follow overall, giving rise to a work
that lacks independence.
POWER
His tongue was framed to music,
And his hand was armed with skill,
His face was the mould of beauty,
And his heart the throne of will.
I
I
I
TIIERE 1s NOT yet any inventory of a man’s faculties, any more than
a bible of his opinions. Who shall set a limit to the influence of a
human being? There are men, who, by their sympathetic attractions,
carry nations with them, and lead the activity of the human race.
And if there be such a tie, that, wherever the mind of man goes, nature will accompany him, perhaps there are men whose magnetisms
are of that force to draw material and elemental powers, and, where
they appear, immense instrumentalities organize around them. Life
is a search after power; and this is an element with which the world
is so saturated,-there is no chink or crevice in which it is not
lodged,-that no honest seeking goes unrewarded. A man should
prize events and possessions as the ore in which this fine mineral is
found; and he can well afford to let events and possessions, and the
breath of the body go, if their value has been added to him in the
shape of power. If he have secured the elixir, he can spare the wide
gardens from which it was distilled. A cultivated man, wise to know
and bold to perform, is the end to which nature works, and the education of the will is the flowering and result of all this geology and
astronomy.
All successful men have agreed in one thing,-they were causationists. T11ey believed that things went not by luck, but by law; that
there was not a weak or a cracked link in the chain that joins the
first and last of things. A belief in causality, or strict connection between every trifle and the principle of being, and, in consequence,
belief in compensation, or, that nothing is got for nothing,-characterizes all valuable minds, and must control every effort that is made
by an industrious one. The most valiant men are the best believers
I
386
.
RALPH
h
WA
LDO
EMERSON
m t e te ·
f

nsion o the laws. “Al1 h
t e great captains,, said Bo
have performed vast ach.
the art,-by acli·usti
ff ievements by conforming’ with th naparte,
e ruJes of
Th e key to the ang e artsb to obsta c1es. ”
ge may e th.
orators clescribe·-t] k
is, or that, or the other
th
.
, as e y
, 1e ey to all
. ages is-Imbecility· imbe .1. . 0 ung
vast majority of me
· eminent m n, at al1. times
.
, an cl, even in ‘heroe ci .ity in th e
certam
.
oments· victims 0 f
.
s, m al! b
gravity, custom a cl f
gives force to the st

Ut
.
rong,-that
the
J
·

n
mu btucle have no h b’ear· ….__
re11ance or original t ·
• nis
ac ion
a 1t of
We must reckon
·
se)f.
.
.
success
a
co
ft
.
ns I ubonal trait. Coura
P h ys1cians taught (a cl th .
en mea nmg
. l1olcls if their ph ge,-the
l1·t t le mythical ) , co n
.
oId
.
, urage or th cl

ys101og 1·
circulation of the bl cl . ‘ h e ~gree of life, is as th cl Y s a
trials of strength w oot]”m t e a~tenes. “During passion e egrec of
!ectecl in the art~rie:e~ng, fi~htmg, a large amount ot’b~ng~r~ fury, /
00
it~ and but little is ; t e_mamtenan_ce of bodily strength
is_ ~oJ.
with intrepid persons ~n~~to th e veins. This condition 1. requmng
age and adventure · “bl ere the arteries hold their bl ~ c?nstant
the veins, the spirit _P~ssi e. Where they pour it unres~o .’ is c?ur0
it needs extraorclin:s w alnhd feeble. For performance of ra mec] Into
ry 11ea
· 1s
· m
. robust hea]tlgrea t mark,
SJ_ep t well, and is at th
t t · If. E nc
1
his departure from G e
of his condition, and thirty ‘ aoc] has
n
reach Newfoundland r~en a cl, he will steer west and /ea~- old, ~t
bolder man,-Biorn · u-h:ake out Eric, and pu~ in a
s ips Will
much ease sail six ,hor d orfin,-ancl the ships will w:toln~er and
, 1 1 Just
f. urt h er, and’ reach L bun cl red ‘ on e th ousancl, fifteen hu
cl cl . as
~n results. With ad altsra or a~c] Ne_w England. There in re hmiles
1th children, one class
m to the game and u h’.
no c ~nee (
th
cold hands a~c] re w_ irbwi the whirling world· the etrl co rclially
,
mam
,
o 1ers
humor and vivacity f th Ysta nders; or are only dragged . b have ,
:,vealth is health. Siciness ~se who c~~ carry a dead weigh/~[ th e (
it must husband i·ts
s poor-spmtecl, and cannot se
first
.
resources to 1·
B
rve any one·
ive. ut health or ful
·
its own ends and h t
borhoocls and creeks afs oh spare, runs over, and inunclatenetshs ans~ers
..
s e neigho ot er men’
A ]] power is of
k . cl
~ necessities.
O
mind that is paral1e~e
,ha sharmg of the nature of the
lei Th -~
1
events, and strong -~ ~ t_e laws of nature will be in th war · e
stuff of which eve w~ t eir st ren_gt?· One man is made c;rent of I
things; can predict ~h made; IS m sympathy with th O
e same ·r·

atever befaHs, befalls him’ first·e co~rse of
‘ so t at he
8
3 7
. equal to whatever shall happen. A man who knows men, can talk
15
· t ra d e, 1aw, war, re1·1gion.
·
F or, everywhere men are
Il on po1·1tics,
11-e

d in the same manners.
f
.
.
Ie
fhe advantage o a strong pulse 1s not to be supplied by any labor,
· l”k
· rears a crop, which
t or concert. It 1s
I e t h e c1·1mate, wh”1ch easily
ar ‘
. . .
·11
glass,
or
ungatwn,
or
ti
age,
or
manures,
can
elsewhere rival. It
n. Olike the opportumty
· o f a city
· l”k
N ew York, or Constantinople
1 ‘e
1s



vhich needs no diplomacy to force capital or genius or labor to it.
1
f h
·

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