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Instructions
Write a four-paragraph, two-to-three-page paper on any short story: WE WILL USE “SWEAT”Literary Devices: You must use two separate literary devices to prove your thesis. Your first body paragraph should focus on one device, and your second body paragraph on a different device. (If you wish to focus on characterization in both body paragraphs, you must focus exclusively on a different character in each paragraph.)Revision and Expansion of “Sweat” Assignment: Read “Sweat” by Zora Neale Hurston (pp. 225-234). You may base this paper on the Hurston characterization paragraphs that you wrote for Workshop Four if you wish. If you do so, however, you will be expected to fully and carefully respond to your instructor’s feedback on those two paragraphs you wrote last week.I HAVE ATTACHED THIS PREVIOUS ASSIGN AND THE PROFESSOR COMMENTS FOR REVISIONUse this Literary Analysis Structural Outline as a template for your paper. Treat the structural outline like a contract each individual piece of which you must try your best to carefully and creatively fulfill.You are encouraged to use this Literary Analysis Writing Process document to walk you through an effective pre-writing, drafting, revision, and editing process.READING: https://www.enotes.com/topics/sweat
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4.5Assign (LaToya
Bradshaw).docx3.docx
by Latoya Bradshaw
Submission date: 19-Mar-2019 09:37AM (UT C-0400)
Submission ID: 1095972927
File name: 4.5Assign_LaT oya_Bradshaw_.docx3.docx
Word count: 392
Character count: 1952
WC
Com/Non
Com/Int ro
LPT
Com/Non
LPT
Spelling
In/Int o
1
Com/Conj
2
C/S
Poss.
Spelling
Redundancy
3
LPT
LPT
Com/Conj
T hat
WC
EM
LPT
LPT
LPT
WC
4
5
WC
LPT
Com/Non
Cont ract ions
6
4.5Assign (LaToya Bradshaw).docx3.docx
ORIGINALITY REPORT
19
%
SIMILARIT Y INDEX
17%
0%
16%
INT ERNET SOURCES
PUBLICAT IONS
ST UDENT PAPERS
PRIMARY SOURCES
1
2
3
13%
www.litcharts.com
Int ernet Source
4%
Submitted to Bridgepoint Education
St udent Paper
2%
cml.harvard.edu
Int ernet Source
Exclude quotes
Of f
Exclude bibliography
Of f
Exclude matches
Of f
4.5Assign (LaToya Bradshaw).docx3.docx
GRADEMARK REPORT
FINAL GRADE
GENERAL COMMENTS
/40
Instructor
PAGE 1
PAGE 2
QM
WC
Word choice error:
Sometimes choosing the correct word to express exactly what you have to say is very dif f icult
to do. Word choice errors can be the result of not paying attention to the word or trying too
hard to come up with a f ancier word when a simple one is appropriate. A thesaurus can be a
handy tool when you’re trying to f ind a word that’s similar to, but more accurate than, the one
you’re looking up. However, it can of ten introduce more problems if you use a word thinking it
has exactly the same meaning.
QM
Com/Non
Use a comma or commas to set of f nonessential elements. Example: T he company, which is
located in Oklahoma, has a good reputation.
QM
Com/Intro
Use a comma to set of f most introductory elements. Example: Even when identical twins are
raised apart, they grow up like each other.
QM
LPT
Literary Present T ense: When discussing the events that happen in literature, your verbs should
be in present tense.
QM
LPT
Literary Present T ense: When discussing the events that happen in literature, your verbs should
be in present tense.
QM
Com/Non
Use a comma or commas to set of f nonessential elements. Example: T he company, which is
located in Oklahoma, has a good reputation.
QM
Spelling
T his word is misspelled.
QM
In/Into
In/Into: When the subject is in motion f rom outside to inside, use “into. When the subject is not
moving f rom outside to inside, use “in.” Examples: I saw the woman run into the building. I have
been here the whole time and have not seen her leave, so I assume she is still in there.
Comment 1
Where is your thesis statement?
QM
Com/Conj
Use a comma bef ore “and,” “but,” or another coordinating conjunction linking main clauses.
Example: Caf f eine can keep cof f ee drinkers alert, and it may make them f eel more energetic.
Comment 2
Yes!
QM
C/S
Comma splice:
A sentence must have both a subject and a main verb in order to be complete, but it cannot
have more than one subject or main verb. A comma splice is a variety of run-on sentence that
occurs when two complete sentences, each with its own subject and verb, are joined mistakenly
by a comma. T here are generally three methods of correcting this problem: 1) Replace the
comma with a stronger mark of punctuation such as a period or semicolon, 2) use a
coordinating conjunction (“and,” “but,” “or,” “nor”) to join the two constructions, or 3) make one
of the two sentences a dependent construction by linking it to the other with a subordinating
conjunction (“if ,” “when,” “so that,” “although,” “because”) or relative pronoun (“that,” “which,”
“who,” “whom,” “whose”).
QM
Poss.
Possessive f orm needed
QM
Spelling
T his word is misspelled.
QM
Redundancy
Redundancy: Keep your language concise. In other words, don’t say the same thing twice, such
as “and so,” “the reason is because,” or “red in color.”
Comment 3
Is this claim supported in the text?
QM
LPT
Literary Present T ense: When discussing the events that happen in literature, your verbs should
be in present tense.
QM
LPT
Literary Present T ense: When discussing the events that happen in literature, your verbs should
be in present tense.
QM
Contractions
Avoid using contractions in academic papers.
QM
That
Missing “that”: In conversation, it is common to leave out the word “that,” but in writing, it must
be present to avoid run-on sentences and f ragments.
Example:
T he aroma of the apple pies was so sweet I almost f elt f ull without tasting them. (INCORRECT )
T he aroma of the apple pies was so sweet that I almost f elt f ull without tasting them.
(CORRECT )
QM
Com/Conj
Use a comma bef ore “and,” “but,” or another coordinating conjunction linking main clauses.
Example: Caf f eine can keep cof f ee drinkers alert, and it may make them f eel more energetic.
QM
WC
Word choice error:
Sometimes choosing the correct word to express exactly what you have to say is very dif f icult
to do. Word choice errors can be the result of not paying attention to the word or trying too
hard to come up with a f ancier word when a simple one is appropriate. A thesaurus can be a
handy tool when you’re trying to f ind a word that’s similar to, but more accurate than, the one
you’re looking up. However, it can of ten introduce more problems if you use a word thinking it
has exactly the same meaning.
QM
EM
Wrong End Mark
QM
LPT
Literary Present T ense: When discussing the events that happen in literature, your verbs should
be in present tense.
QM
LPT
Literary Present T ense: When discussing the events that happen in literature, your verbs should
be in present tense.
QM
LPT
Literary Present T ense: When discussing the events that happen in literature, your verbs should
be in present tense.
QM
WC
Word choice error:
Sometimes choosing the correct word to express exactly what you have to say is very dif f icult
to do. Word choice errors can be the result of not paying attention to the word or trying too
hard to come up with a f ancier word when a simple one is appropriate. A thesaurus can be a
handy tool when you’re trying to f ind a word that’s similar to, but more accurate than, the one
you’re looking up. However, it can of ten introduce more problems if you use a word thinking it
has exactly the same meaning.
Comment 4
You are required to include three quotes in each paragraph.
Comment 5
Yes!
QM
WC
Word choice error:
Sometimes choosing the correct word to express exactly what you have to say is very dif f icult
to do. Word choice errors can be the result of not paying attention to the word or trying too
hard to come up with a f ancier word when a simple one is appropriate. A thesaurus can be a
handy tool when you’re trying to f ind a word that’s similar to, but more accurate than, the one
you’re looking up. However, it can of ten introduce more problems if you use a word thinking it
has exactly the same meaning.
QM
LPT
Literary Present T ense: When discussing the events that happen in literature, your verbs should
be in present tense.
QM
Com/Non
Use a comma or commas to set of f nonessential elements. Example: T he company, which is
located in Oklahoma, has a good reputation.
PAGE 3
Comment 6
You are required to include at least three quotes in each paragraph.
PAGE 4
LITERARY ANALYSIS: PROCESS GUIDE
This guide assumes you are basing this final essay on a revision of your “Sweat” thesis and
characterization paragraphs. If you choose to write on another story, you should start with the
characterization paragraph process guide from last week and then use steps nine and following
below to help you draft your concluding and introductory paragraphs.
1. Revise the Hurston thesis you wrote last week, responding to any feedback your instructor
has given you.
2. (Gather support quotations for each body paragraph, being guided by any feedback your
instructor may have given you on the quotations you gathered last week and making sure
you have at least one quotation to prove each theme that you plan to prove in each body
paragraph. You may need to reread the story, or you may be able to find what you need
using a searchable online text such as this one: Searchable Text of “Sweat.”)
3. Revise the topic sentence for your first body paragraph, carefully and fully responding to
any advice given by your instructor on your characterization paragraphs from Workshop
4.
4. (Make sure support quotations for first body paragraph are arranged in an ideal order—
often following the order of any lists in your topic sentence or starting with any quotations
that represent initial causes and ending with those that represent final effects is a helpful
organizational approach.)
5. Revise first body paragraph, carefully and fully responding to any advice given by your
instructor on your characterization paragraphs from Workshop 4.
6. Revise the topic sentence for your first body paragraph, carefully and fully responding to
any advice given by your instructor on your characterization paragraphs from Workshop
4.
7. (Check arrangement of support quotations.)
8. Revise second body paragraph, carefully and fully responding to any advice given by your
instructor on your characterization paragraphs from Workshop 4.
9. (Locate an opening quotation which contains at least one of your thesis themes in it and
which has the same basic attitude towards that theme as your thesis. Use a famous
quotation, a biblical quotation, or a quotation from “Sweat” which you do NOT use in the
body of your essay. Do your best to choose a quotation which will work well as a clincher
where you might want to revise the quotation, substituting in as many key thesis themes as
you can.
10. Draft introductory paragraph, using the Structural Outline as a guide.
11. Draft General Statement of Evaluation (GSoE) for your Conclusion. (See structural outline
for details.)
12. (Gather at least three biblical quotations which support your General Statement of
Evaluation, using Biblegateway.com. Make sure that every quotation has both the same
topic as your GSoE and the same general attitude.)
13. (Arrange biblical quotations in logical order, often starting and ending with a strong
quotation and burying the weakest in the middle of your paragraph is a good approach.)
14. Draft concluding paragraph, using the Structural Outline as a guide and plugging in the
GSoE and the quotations you have already gathered in their appropriate places. Do not
forget to introduce each biblical passage before quoting it and to fully apply each biblical
passage after you quote it.
15. (Arrange four drafted paragraphs in the order described in the Structural Outline.)
16. Review all comments which your instructor made on the introduction and conclusion of
final draft of your “Yellow Wall-paper” essay. Treat those comments as principles, and do
your best to make sure you are not having the same issues in the introduction or conclusion
of this current essay.
17. Use the Structural Outline document as a self-guide and carefully check to see that your
draft is fulfilling each and every part of the Structural Outline.
18. Word Choice and Syntax Variety: take a moment to make sure you are using a variety of
word choice and syntax when you restate parts of your thesis in your topic sentences,
summary-concluding sentences, and your thesis restatement (at beginning of concluding
paragraph). Be very careful not to change the cause-effect relationships between your
thesis themes when you revise for variety of word choice or syntax. Take a moment also to
make sure that you are using a variety in your word choice and syntax in the way that you
introduce each quotation and the way that you begin each quotation application. (“Syntax”
basically means the order in which you arrange words and sentences.)
19. Review your instructor’s feedback on your Gilman and Hurston papers, focusing only on
issues of grammar, punctuation, and APA formatting/documentation. Carefully check this
draft to make sure you have corrected any similar errors.
20. Proofread your final draft, preferably printing it out and reading it out loud to a family
member or friend.
LITERARY ANALYSIS: STRUCTURAL OUTLINE
1. Introductory Paragraph:
a. Opener: Start with a quotation that has at least one thesis theme in it and which has
the same or similar attitude towards that theme as appears in your thesis. Use one of
these two websites to search by theme/keyword to find quotation
options: BibleGatway.com or Famous-quotations.com. Transitions: Make sure that
immediately after your opening quotation you include a transition sentence which
uses key words from the quotation to make a clear connection between the
opening quote and one or more main thesis themes. (Remember to also grab the kind
of APA info that you will need in order to include appropriate parenthetical and
references-page documentation in your paper.)
b. Plot Summary: Give a very brief (3-5 sentence) version of a plot summary which only
focuses on conveying the major actions or events of the story which are directly
related to your key thesis themes. This should not sound like an extended character
summary, but should focus on actions of the characters which illustrate the main
themes of your thesis.
c. Thesis: Title (of story) + Author + Method (characterization/symbolism/setting) +
Message (Themes + Attitudes towards themes, including final results).
2. First Body Paragraph:
a. Topic Sentence: Piece of the topic + attitude you plan to prove in this paragraph +
author + method you will use in this paragraph. (Often this will be a good template
for starting your topic sentence for the paragraph that focuses on the narrator:
Through the characterization of Sykes, Hurston suggests that…[plug in the part of
the message from your thesis that you can prove with narrator characterization
quotations].
b. First Support Example:
1. Introduce Quotation: 1-sentence or less; no need for plot summary; helpful
strategies: identify speaker or writer of passage quoted or locate the quote within
the timing of the story (e.g., “Later in the story, ….”). (Do not forget to include
transition words so that your reader knows when you are transitioning from
your topic sentence into your first example and when you transition from one
example to the next. For example or for instance work well when transitioning
from a topic sentence into your first example. Words like the following usually
work well when transitioning between support examples: moreover,
additionally, furthermore, also, later.)
2. Quote: Quote word for word; 1-2 sentences from the “Sweat” which explicitly
prove one or more themes from your topic sentence; document properly using
parenthetical APA documentation which would require (name of author,
original date of publication, p. [page number]) the first time you quote from
Hurston. Thereafter, you can just use page numbers. (Use the book chapter
model in the IWU APA Guide for your reference page entry, starting with
Hurston’s name, followed by the original date of publication which you can find
on the final page of the story, followed by information on the textbook in which
the story is anthologized.)
3. Application: This is an extremely important step. Include it for every
quotation! Explain in a single sentence (or two at most) how you see the
quotation proving one or more thesis themes. (It is almost impossible to do this
effectively unless you find a way to creatively include both the key thesis
theme(s) being proven and the words or phrases from the quotation that
most directly proves that theme(s).)
c. Second Support Example: (same template as first)
d. Third Support Example: (same template as first)
e. Fourth Support Example (same template as first; you may not need four or more
quotations if you successfully can prove all main thesis ideas in your topic sentence
with just three).
f. Concluding Summary Sentence: This should essentially be a restatement of your
topic sentence adding in very brief AND specific reminders of HOW you proved
your topic sentence in each support example from that paragraph. (These
reminders are often best accomplished by using a key word from each quotation.)
3. Second Body Paragraph: (same template as first body paragraph; however, you will
focus exclusively either on a second character or on some literary device other than
characterization in this paragraph)
4. Concluding Paragraph:
a. Thesis Restatement: Exact same content as original thesis, but expressed in
different words and syntax (or phrasing), making sure you do not change the causeeffect relationships in your original thesis in the process of restating). This should
only take one sentence.
b. General Statement of Evaluation: In a single sentence, explain which part of the
thesis topic and attitude you will evaluate and whether or not you think the bible
basically agrees or disagrees with that part of Hurston’s message. This sentence
essentially serves as a topic sentence for the rest of this paragraph, taking a position
on what you intend to prove with the quotations that will follow. (For example, if
your thesis suggests that Delia’s prayers are one of the causes of the positive things
that happen to her at the end of the story, you could use a General Statement of
Evaluation like this: Scripture would seem to agree with Hurston that prayer should
be practiced because it can be beneficial.)
c. Support for General Statement:
a. Support Example One:
1. Introduce Quotation: Use a single sentence to introduce your first
biblical support quotation, identifying the speaker or writer of the
scripture you are about to quote. (Do not forget to include transition words
so that your reader knows when you are transitioning from your general
statement into your first example and when you transition from one
example to the next.)
2. Quote: Quote word for word one or two sentences from the Bible which
contain the same topic and attitude you promised to prove in your general
statement of evaluation.

Finding Scriptures: use a website like this to search for appropriate
support scriptures: www.biblegateway.com.
• Example: If you were using the sample general statement given
above, you could look for any combination of three biblical verses
which 1) explicitly encourage the reader to pray or even better 2)
explicitly state that prayer has some kind of positive results.
• Documentation: APA asks for book, chapter, and verse as well as the
translation you are using in parenthetical documentation, like this
(Proverbs 12:1, New International Version). When using APA, the
bible is one of the very few sources which you do NOT have to include
on your References page.
3. Application: This is an extremely important step. Include it for every
quotation! Explain in a single sentence (or two at most) how you see the
quotation supporting your general statement of evaluation. To be
convincing, this application must include all of the following:
• Key words from the biblical quotation.
• The theme you are trying to prove from your general statement.
• A direct comparison to something that you proved in your body
about Hurston’s story that parallels what the scripture is saying (in
order to prove, in the example we have been using, that Hurston’s
message actually agrees with this scripture).
b. Support Example Two: (use same three-part template)
c. Support Example Three: (use same three-part template)
d. Clincher: A creative restatement of your General Statement of Evaluation. (If you
can make it work, try returning to your opening quotation from the beginning of the
essay or one of your biblical quotations from your concluding paragraph and
creatively revising it, weaving in key thesis terms as you can.)*
*Example of Clincher: Suppose the following had been key pieces of the “Yellow Wall-paper”
essay you wrote in Workshop 3.
Thesis: In the “Yellow Wall-paper,” Gilman use characterization to suggest that when a
faithless husband isolates and imprisons his depressed wife, her only hope o …
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