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Assignment Instructions:Read and analyze the following five PDF documents attached and provide a discussion regarding the following:
discuss the specific purpose of each document
discuss the scope of each document
discuss the core capabilities of each document
describe how each document is related in
support of emergency disaster management operations
Ensure everything is completed in
APA format especially citing of sources which will be the 5 attached documents.
Minimum word posting should be 500 words-no max word count, just ensure all
discussion topics is covered.
assignment_instruction.docx

national_preparedness_goal_2nd_edition.pdf

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national_prevention_framework_2nd.pdf

national_mitigation_framework2nd.pdf

threat_and_hazard_identification_and_risk_assessment_guide.pdf

whole_community_approach.pdf

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Read and analyze the following five documents attached: (1) National Preparedness Goal; (2) the Whole
Community Approach; (3) the National Prevention Framework; (4) the National Mitigation Framework, and (5)
Threat and Hazard Identification and Risk Assessment Guide.
Provide a discussion regarding the following:




discuss the specific purpose of each document
discuss the scope of each document
discuss the core capabilities of each document
describe how each document is related in support of emergency disaster management operations
Ensure everything is completed in APA format especially citing of sources which will be the 5 attached
documents. Minimum word posting should be 500 words-no max word count, just ensure all discussion topics
is covered.
National Preparedness
Goal
Second Edition
September 2015
National Preparedness Goal
Ta b l e o f C o n t e n t s
Introduction ……………………………………………………………………………………………………. 1
Core Capabilities …………………………………………………………………………………………….. 3
Overview …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………..3
Risk and the Core Capabilities …………………………………………………………………………………..4
Mission Area: Prevention …………………………………………………………………………………………..5
Mission Area: Protection ……………………………………………………………………………………………8
Mission Area: Mitigation …………………………………………………………………………………………10
Mission Area: Response …………………………………………………………………………………………..12
Mission Area: Recovery …………………………………………………………………………………………..17
Conclusion and Next Steps ……………………………………………………………………………. 21
Appendix A: Terms and Definitions………………………………………………………………. A-1
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National Preparedness Goal
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National Preparedness Goal
Introduction
Preparedness is the shared responsibility of our entire nation. The whole community contributes,
beginning with individuals and communities, the private and nonprofit sectors, faith-based
organizations, and all governments (local, regional/metropolitan, state, tribal1, territorial, insular
area2, and Federal). This second edition of the National Preparedness Goal reflects the insights
and lessons learned from four years of real world events and implementation of the National
Preparedness System.3
We describe our security and resilience posture through the core capabilities (see Table 1) that
are necessary to deal with the risks we face. We use an integrated, layered, and all-of-Nation
approach as our foundation for building and sustaining core capabilities and preparing to deliver
them effectively. The National Preparedness Goal is:
A secure and resilient Nation with the capabilities required across the
whole community to prevent, protect against, mitigate, respond to, and
recover from the threats and hazards that pose the greatest risk.
Using the core capabilities, we achieve the National Preparedness Goal by:

Preventing, avoiding, or stopping a threatened or an actual act of terrorism.

Protecting our citizens, residents, visitors, assets, systems, and networks against the greatest
threats and hazards in a manner that allows our interests, aspirations, and way of life to
thrive.

Mitigating the loss of life and property by lessening the impact of future disasters.

Responding quickly to save lives, protect property and the environment, and meet basic
human needs in the aftermath of an incident.

Recovering through a focus on the timely restoration, strengthening, and revitalization of
infrastructure, housing, and the economy, as well as the health, social, cultural, historic, and
environmental fabric of communities affected by an incident.
The core capabilities contained in the Goal are the distinct critical elements necessary for our
success. They are highly interdependent and require us to use existing preparedness networks
and activities, coordinate and unify efforts, improve training and exercise programs, promote
innovation, leverage and enhance our science and technology capacity, and ensure that
administrative, finance, and logistics systems are in place to support these capabilities. The core
capabilities serve as both preparedness tools and a means of structured implementation. All
manner of incidents across the whole community have proven the usefulness of the core
capabilities and the coordinating structures that sustain and deliver them. These range from
1
The Federal Government recognizes that the tribal right of self-government flows from the inherent sovereignty of
American Indian and Alaska Native Tribes as nations and that federally recognized tribes have a unique and direct
relationship with the Federal Government.
2
Per the Stafford Act, insular areas include Guam, the Commonwealth of the Northern Mariana Islands, American
Samoa, and the U.S. Virgin Islands. Other statutes or departments and agencies may define the term insular area
differently.
3
The National Preparedness System outlines an organized process for the whole community to move forward with
its preparedness activities and achieve the National Preparedness Goal.
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National Preparedness Goal
localized and regional incidents, larger events involving both Stafford Act4 disaster and
emergency declarations, and operations conducted under other authorities (e.g., response to an
emerging infectious disease outbreak).
Individual and community preparedness is fundamental to our National success. Providing
individuals and communities with information and resources will facilitate actions to adapt to
and withstand an emergency or disaster. As we have seen in tragic incidents both at home and
abroad, anyone can contribute to safeguarding the Nation from harm. Our national resilience can
be improved, for example, by raising awareness of the techniques that can save lives through
such basic actions as stopping life-threatening bleeding. By providing the necessary knowledge
and skills, we seek to enable the whole community to contribute to and benefit from national
preparedness. Whole community contributors include children5; older adults; individuals with
disabilities and others with access and functional needs; those from religious, racial, and
ethnically diverse backgrounds; people with limited English proficiency; and owners of animals
including household pets and service animals. Their needs and contributions must be integrated
into our efforts. Each community contributes to the Goal by individually preparing for the risks
that are most relevant and urgent for them individually. By empowering individuals and
communities with knowledge and skills they can contribute to achieving the National
Preparedness Goal.
We continue to make progress in building and sustaining our national preparedness. The Goal
builds on these achievements, but our aspirations must be even higher to match the greatest risks
facing our Nation. As we prepare for these challenges, our core capabilities will evolve to meet
those challenges.
4
The Robert T. Stafford Disaster Relief and Emergency Assistance Act (Stafford Act) authorizes the President to
provide financial and other assistance to local, state, tribal, territorial, and insular area governments, as well as
Federal agencies, to support Response and Recovery efforts in the wake of emergency or major disaster
declarations.
5
Children require a unique set of considerations across the core capabilities contained within this document. Their
needs must be taken into consideration as part of any integrated planning effort.
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National Preparedness Goal
Core Capabilities
O ve r vi ew
Core capabilities are essential for the execution of each of the five mission areas: Prevention,
Protection, Mitigation, Response, and Recovery (see Table 1). The core capabilities are not
exclusive to any single government or organization, but rather require the combined efforts of
the whole community.
Table 1: Core Capabilities by Mission Area6
Prevention
Protection
Mitigation
Response
Recovery
Planning
Public Information and Warning
Operational Coordination
Intelligence and Information Sharing
Community
Resilience
Interdiction and Disruption
Long-term
Vulnerability
Reduction
Screening, Search, and Detection
Forensics and
Attribution
Access Control
and Identity
Verification
Cybersecurity
Physical
Protective
Measures
Risk
Management for
Protection
Programs and
Activities
Supply Chain
Integrity and
Security
Risk and Disaster
Resilience
Assessment
Threats and
Hazards
Identification
Infrastructure Systems
Critical Transportation
Economic
Recovery
Environmental
Response/Health and
Safety
Health and
Social Services
Fatality Management
Services
Fire Management and
Suppression
Housing
Natural and
Cultural
Resources
Logistics and Supply
Chain Management
Mass Care Services
Mass Search and
Rescue Operations
On-scene Security,
Protection, and Law
Enforcement
Operational
Communications
Public Health,
Healthcare, and
Emergency Medical
Services
Situational
Assessment
6
Planning, Public Information and Warning, and Operational Coordination are common to all mission areas.
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National Preparedness Goal
These five mission areas serve as an aid in organizing our national preparedness activities and
enabling integration and coordination across core capabilities. The mission areas are interrelated
and require collaboration in order to be effective. The National Planning Frameworks and
Federal Interagency Operational Plans expand on these relationships, to include how the mission
areas and core capabilities are used to achieve the goal of a secure and resilient nation.
Three core capabilities: Planning, Public Information and Warning, and Operational
Coordination span all five mission areas. They serve to unify the mission areas and, in many
ways, are necessary for the success of the remaining core capabilities. Additionally, a number of
core capabilities directly involve more than one mission area and are listed in each mission area
as appropriate.
The core capabilities, like the risks we face, are not static. They will be vetted and refined, taking
into consideration the evolving risk and, changing resource requirements. Further, there is an
expectation that each of the core capabilities will leverage advances in science and technology
and be improved through post-event evaluation and assessment.
R i s k an d t h e Co re C ap ab i l i t i e s
Understanding the greatest risks to the Nation’s security and resilience is a critical step in
identifying the core capabilities. All levels of government and the whole community should
assess and present risk in a similar manner to provide a common understanding of the threats and
hazards confronting our Nation. The information gathered during a risk assessment also enables
a prioritization of preparedness efforts and an ability to identify our capability requirements
across the whole community.
The Strategic National Risk Assessment indicates that a wide range of threats and hazards
continue to pose a significant risk to the Nation, affirming the need for an all-hazards, capabilitybased approach to preparedness planning. Key findings include:

Natural hazards, including hurricanes, earthquakes, tornadoes, droughts, wildfires, winter
storms, and floods, present a significant and varied risk across the country. Climate change
has the potential to cause the consequence of weather-related hazards to become more severe.

A virulent strain of pandemic influenza could kill hundreds of thousands of Americans, affect
millions more, and result in economic loss. Additional human and animal infectious diseases,
including those undiscovered, may present significant risks.

Technological and accidental hazards, such as transportation system failures, dam failures,
chemical spills or releases, have the potential to cause extensive fatalities and severe
economic impacts. In addition, these hazards may increase due to aging infrastructure.

Terrorist organizations or affiliates may seek to acquire, build, and use weapons of mass
destruction (WMD). Conventional terrorist attacks, including those by “lone actors”
employing physical threats such as explosives and armed attacks, present a continued risk to
the Nation.

Cyber-attacks can have catastrophic consequences, which in turn, can lead to other hazards,
such as power grid failures or financial system failures. These cascading hazards increase the
potential impact of cyber incidents. Cybersecurity threats exploit the increased complexity
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National Preparedness Goal
and connectivity of critical infrastructure systems, placing the Nation’s security, economy,
and public safety and health at risk.

Some incidents, such as explosives attacks or earthquakes, generally cause more localized
impacts, while other incidents, such as human pandemics, may cause impacts that are
dispersed throughout the Nation, thus creating different types of impacts for preparedness
planners to consider.
In addition to these findings, climate change has the potential to adversely impact a number of
threats and hazards. Rising sea levels, increasingly powerful storms, and heavier downpours are
already contributing to an increased risk of flooding. Droughts and wildfires are becoming more
frequent and severe in some areas of the country.
Cybersecurity poses its own unique challenges. In addition to the risk that cyber-threats pose to
the nation, cybersecurity represents a core capability integral to preparedness efforts across the
whole community. In order to meet the threat, preparedness planners must not only consider the
unique core capability outlined in the Protection mission area, but must also consider integrating
cyber preparedness throughout core capabilities in every mission area.
These findings supported the update of the core capabilities. Additionally, the Response and
Recovery mission areas go one step further by focusing on a set of core capabilities based on the
impact of a series of cascading incidents. Such incidents would likely stress the abilities of our
Nation. A developed set of planning factors, intended to mimic this cascading incident and
identify the necessary core capabilities, draws upon three hazards identified by the Strategic
National Risk Assessment (i.e., large-scale earthquake, major hurricane, WMD attack).
The risks faced by a community can directly impact those responsible for delivering core
capabilities. The whole community must maintain the ability to conduct mission essential
functions during an actual hazard or incident to ensure delivery of core capabilities for all
mission areas. The scope and magnitude of a catastrophic incident may result in a resource
scarce environment. Because such incidents may affect an organization’s ability to provide
assets, assistance, and services, continuity planning and operations are an inherent component of
each core capability and the coordinating structures that provide them. Continuity operations
increase resilience and the likelihood that organizations can perform essential functions and
deliver core capabilities that support the mission areas.
M i s si o n A r e a: P r ev en t i o n
Prevention includes those capabilities necessary to avoid, prevent, or stop a threatened or actual
act of terrorism. Unlike other mission areas, which are all-hazards by design, Prevention core
capabilities are focused specifically on imminent terrorist threats, including on-going attacks or
stopping imminent follow-on attacks.
In addition, preventing an imminent terrorist threat will trigger a robust counterterrorism
response wherein all instruments of national power may be used to resolve threats and save lives.
Prevention also includes activities such as intelligence, law enforcement, and homeland defense
as examples of activities conducted to address and resolve the threat.
The terrorist threat is dynamic and complex, and combating it is not the sole responsibility of a
single entity or community. Ensuring the security of the homeland requires terrorism prevention
through extensive collaboration with government and nongovernmental entities, international
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National Preparedness Goal
partners, and the private sector. We will foster a rapid, coordinated, all-of-Nation, effective
terrorism prevention effort that reflects the full range of capabilities critical to avoid, prevent, or
stop a threatened or actual act of terrorism in the homeland.
The Prevention mission area relies on ongoing support activities from across all mission areas
that prepare the whole community to execute the core capabilities for preventing an imminent
terrorist threat. These activities include information sharing efforts that directly support local
communities in preventing terrorism and other activities that are precursors or indicators of
terrorist activity and violent extremism.
Table 2 defines and details the Prevention core capabilities and the preliminary targets
associated with each.
Table 2: Prevention Mission Area Core Capabilities and Preliminary Targets
Prevention Mission Area Core Capabilities and Preliminary Targets
Planning
Conduct a systematic process engaging the whole community as appropriate in
the development of executable strategic, operational, and/or tactical-level
approaches to meet defined objectives.
1. Identify critical objectives during the planning process, provide a complete and integrated picture of
the sequence and scope of the tasks to achieve the objectives, and ensure the objectives are
implementable within the time frame contemplated within the plan using available resources for
prevention-related plans.
2. Develop and execute appropriate courses of action in coordination with local, state, tribal, territorial,
Federal, and private sector entities in order to prevent an imminent terrorist attack within the United
States.
Public Information
and Warning
Deliver coordinated, prompt, reliable, and actionable information to the whole
community through the use of clear, consistent, accessible, and culturally and
linguistically appropriate methods to effectively relay information regarding any
threat or hazard, as well as the actions being taken and the assistance being
made available, as appropriate.
1. Share prompt and actionable messages, to include National Terrorism Advisory System alerts, with
the public and other stakeholders, as appropriate, to aid in the prevention of imminent or follow-on
terrorist attacks, consistent with the timelines specified by existing processes and protocols.
2. Provide public awareness information to inform the general public on how to identify and provide
terrorism-related information to the appropriate law enforcement authorities, thereby enabling the
public to act as a force multiplier in the prevention of imminent or follow-on acts of terrorism.
Operational
Coordination
Establish and maintain a unified and coordinated operational structure and
process that appropriately integrates all critical stakeholders and supports the
execution of core capabilities.
1. Execute operations with functional and integrated communications among appropriate entities to
prevent initial or follow-on terrorist attacks within the United States in accordance with established
protocols.
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National Preparedness Goal
Prevention Mission Area Core Ca …
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