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i have ready essay with professor notes i want to revise in good way that follow the professor notes and the prompt to get A if you want to write another one same as professor direction or revise mine i do not mind but at the end it should written in academic way that follow the prompt and the directions.in this essay i am going to send the prompt, the ready essay with professor notes,and both article that used in the essay. and it is ANALYZING RHETORICAL
STRATEGIES IN TWO TEXTS by using pathos ,logos ….etc. and the essay should be done by April 9 so still have much time to analysis it and make it good.thank you
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Alshakarchi1
Tiba al shakarchi
3-18-19
Project two
Do safe spaces play a role in the community?
Are “safe places” wasting our time? Colleges are meant for discovering a wide range of
topics and ideas that will challenge a student’s perspective. There are many opinions about this
topic . Many believe that students in universities, and colleges, should be allowed to have “safe
spaces,” like Morton Schapiro, the author of “I’m Northwestern’s president. Here’s why safe
spaces for students are important.” He is the president of Northwestern University and he is
targeting the write that email them ever yday asking them about how the campus if focused on
“black lives matter.” You can see this because he has stated, “Our usual practice is to thank the
sender for writing and leave it at that. The combination of receiving more than 100 emails and
letters a day and recognizing that the purpose of many writers is to rebuke, rather than discuss,
leaves us little choice about how to respond……..Some writers ask why our campus is so
focused on how “black lives matter.” This is showing who he is answering with this letter.
Others believe that students should not be allowed to have “safe places” in universities and
colleges. The university of Chicago is one of many that believe this. Their main audience are the
new students. This is because this letter is perfectly for the new students that have been selected
to go to this university. The author of this article is John (Jay) Ellison. The university says
“Welcome and congratulations on your acceptance to the College at the University of Chicago.
Earning a place in our community of scholars is no small achievement and we are delighted that
you selected Chicago to continue your intellectual journey.” Which shows who this letter is for?
Alshakarchi2
Both play very well on emotion, but they fall to make the audience believe their point of view by
not providing any strong evidence.
Schapiro uses a real-life story to evoke pathos. It was about have people felt and made
the students and the writers also have emotion. This is because many of the evidence used is just
stories of people’s feelings. For example, this story “ A group of black students were having
lunch together in a campus dining hall. There were a couple of empty seats, and two white
students asked if they could join them. One of the black students asked why, in light of empty
tables nearby. The reply was that these students wanted to stretch themselves by engaging in the
kind of uncomfortable learning the college encourages. The black students politely said no. Is
this really so scandalous?” This story was just saying how two white students were asking to sit
with African American students and how they polity said no. However, later in the article it it
twisted to be that the African American students were not getting their right of freedom. It is said
in this quote here: “And that brings me to the second aspect: We all deserve safe spaces. Those
black students had every right to enjoy their lunches in peace. There are plenty of times and
places to engage in uncomfortable learning, but that weren’t one of them. The white students,
while well-meaning, didn’t have the right to unilaterally decide when uncomfortable learning
would take place.” This is not correct because all the white students were trying to do was make
them self learn in a situation. This used pathos because it show how it made the African
American “ have less” freedom when they are at lunch, and it making us feel bad for them.
However, the white student might never try to ask other from different races and this could
create segregation. This could also be pathos because it would make us feel bad for the white
students.
Alshakarchi3
Ellison states that “Our commitment to academic freedom means that we do not support
so-called “trigger warnings,” and they “do not condone the creation of intellectual ‘safe spaces.’”
They says this because they say that “we do not cancel invited speakers because their topics
might prove controversial,…….where individuals can retreat from ideas and perspectives at odds
with their own.” In other words, this does not allow the student to be unique and different from
other. They use more of This because he makes the student trust a little because he is a big fuger
to the university. He say “ Members of our community are encouraged to speak, write, listen,
challenge and learn, without fear of censorship. Civility and mutual respect are vital to all of us,
and freedom of expression does not mean the freedom to harass or threaten others. You will find
that we expect members of our community to be engaged in rigorous debate, discussion, and
even disagreement.” This is Ethos because the Insides are making the student trust them on that
they university knows best. Also that it would make the students believe that university is correct
and this will allow the student to learn more about topics and learn better. Which is most likely
correct? This would help the student challenge their belief and push them to their potential. Let’s
not forget that like Schapiro, Ellison plays with student’s emotions. He says “Welcome and
congratulations on your acceptance to the College at the University of Chicago.…….Once here
you will discover that one of the University of Chicago’s defining characteristics is our
commitment to freedom of inquiry and expression. This is captured in the University’s faculty
report on freedom of expression” This is getting the student be too happy and excited that they
have been accepted to the university. Also, since this it is form the president of the university it
will make them believe that he knows best from the students.
The audience of both articles would believe the point of view if more solid evidence was
used. This is because both of these articles talk about what they believe and what they see.
Alshakarchi4
However, they do not use many facts or data to prove their points. For instance, Schapiro states
that “ First, the familiar question is ‘Why do the black students eat together in the cafeteria?’ I
think I have some insight on this based on 16 years of living on or near a college campus: Many
groups eat together in the cafeteria, but people seem to notice only when the students are black”
He says I think and does not show it with facts. It is only his belief. Ellison way on not using
logos is by saying “ times this may challenge you and even cause discomfort. Our commitment
to academic freedom means that we do not support so-called ‘trigger warnings,’ we do not cancel
invited speakers because their topics might prove controversial.” This shows that it what the
commit believe and not what is based of facts or statics. They just say what they believe. If they
would have used some data and not just stories, then it would have been more convincing, and it
will make the reader change their mind and agree with them statement/ thesis. Because of the
lack of evidence, the reader has a harder time believing the writer.
In conclusion, both of the articles used one or two parts of Ethos pathos and logos.
Morton Schapiro the writer of “I’m Northwestern’s president. Here’s why safe spaces for
students are important” uses more of pathos in his writing and does not uses a lot of logos. John
(Jay) Ellison the writer of “Dear Class of 2020” also uses pathos and ethos but also does not
logos. If both of these writers had just added a little logos and facts in their writing that it would
have been easier to believe them and understand their points of view. They based the writing on
opinions and trust that the audience would just believe them. They did not think thought about
how much more evidence that would have made the audience believe more.
Alshakarchi5
ellison, jay. “University Of Chicago Sends The Acceptance Letter Every College
Should.” The Federalist, 25 Aug. 2016, thefederalist.com/2016/08/25/university-of-chicagosends-the-acceptance-letter-every-college-should.
Schapiro, Morton. “I’m Northwestern’s President. Here’s Why Safe Spaces for Students
Are Important.” The Washington Post, WP Company, 15 Jan. 2016.
Alshakarchi6
Project Two Rubric:
Analyzing
Rhetorical
Strategies in Two
Texts
Comprehension
30%
Organization
30%
Development
30%
Expression
10%
Percentage:
A-Range
B-Range
C-Range
D-Range
F-Range
(Exceptional
quality)
(Very good
quality)
(Acceptable
quality)
(Needs
improvement)
(Does not meet
expectations)
Writer
effectively
addresses all
aspects of the
prompt
Writer
adequately
addresses all
aspects of the
prompt
Writer meets a
Writer meets
basic
some of the
requirement of requirements of
assignment
assignment
expectations,
expectations,
but not as
but not all;
thoroughly as B
needs
or A papers
improvement
Writer does not
meet
expectations of
assignment
Essay two is
extremely wellorganized at
both the
paragraph and
sentence level
Essay two is
well-organized
at both the
paragraph and
sentence level
Essay two
organized in a
way that is
acceptable, but
needs
development
Essay two lacks
organization at
both the
sentence level
and paragraph
level
Essay two lacks
organization;
does not follow
logical
progression of
ideas.
Essay two
details/analyzes
chosen texts
thoroughly and
thoughtfully;
rhetorical
strategies are
identified and
evaluated for
effectiveness
Essay two
details/analyzes
chosen texts
moderately;
rhetorical
strategies may
be identified
and evaluated
Essay two
acceptably
details/analyzes
chosen texts;
rhetorical
appeals are
identified—not
strategies
Essay two does
not include
developed
ideas; analysis
of rhetorical
strategies is
minimal
Very little to no
development of
ideas
Sophisticated Very good use of
use of grammar,
grammar,
mechanics, and
mechanics, and
formatting.
formatting
Acceptable use
of grammar,
mechanics, and
formatting
Developmental
use of
grammar,
mechanics, and
formatting
Expression gets
in the way of
meaning; many
errors
throughout
C: 74%
D:
F:
A:
B:
Due: March 19th by midnight on Blackboard
PROJECT #2: ANALYZING RHETORICAL
STRATEGIES IN TWO TEXTS
CONTEXT:
For your previous essay, you walked through Shulevtiz’s argument and analyzed her claims and evidence. For this
paper, you will still analyze; however, you will focus your analysis on the rhetorical strategies that two writers use
to progress their arguments. After reading “Dear Class of 2020,” “Don’t Blame Students for Being
Hypersensitive,” “Students Deserve Safe Spaces,” “I’m Northwestern’s President,” and “College Campuses Should
Not Be Safe Spaces,” your job is to choose two texts and analyze how they appeal to ethos, pathos, logos, and/or
kairos to advance their arguments. You can think of this essay as a compare/contrast.
ASSIGNMENT:
You will need to account for the following elements (though they do not need
to be approached in this particular order. Additionally, your essay should not
read as though you are simply answering these questions.




Identify both authors & their texts
o Who are they? What is their credibility?
▪ What do we know about their texts?
Identify both authors’ overall argument
o What is the argument?
▪ How do you know? Is it stated directly? Implicitly?
Identify the audience for each text
o How do you know?
▪ What details from the text point to the type of audience the author has in mind?
o How does the audience influence how the text is written and perceived?
Analyze & Evaluate the rhetorical strategies each author uses to advance their claims & overall argument
o What types of evidence does each author use? Logic, emotional, credible, timely?
▪ Why does the rhetorical strategy advance/hinder their overall argument?
• How?
IMPORTANT DETAILS:



4-5 pages
MLA Format
MLA Works Cited Page
EVALUATION CRITERIA:
→ Comprehension
o Effectively addresses all aspects of the prompt
o Fully grasps both articles and showcases knowledge cogently
→ Development
o Details/analyzes chosen texts thoroughly and thoughtfully
Due: March 19th by midnight on Blackboard
o
Writer thoroughly address elements of the argument, including author, context, audience,
purpose, claims, and evidence.
o Analysis of rhetorical strategies is thorough
→ Organization
o Essay flows logically from introduction → body → conclusion
o Sentence level organization is strong
→ Expression/Mechanics/Grammar
▪ Writer uses appropriate syntax, grammar, punctuation
IMPORTANT DATES:

02.19: Intro to Project/Reading “Dear Class of 2020”/Rhetorical Appeals

02.26: In class reading/charting activities/synthesizing texts

03.05: Drafting Activities

03.12: Peer Review Workshop—Must complete in class

03.19: Final Draft Due on Blackboard by midnight
SLOS:
→ Develop an effective process of reading for comprehension
→ Develop an effective writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revision, and self-evaluation
→ Analyze the elements of academic texts—particularly argument, genre, audience, context, purpose, and
strategies
→ Articulate in writing key rhetorical concepts.
The Washington Post
Opinions
I’m Northwestern’s
president. Here’s why safe
spaces for students are
important.
By Morton Schapiro January 15, 2016
Morton Schapiro is president of Northwestern University.
College presidents have always received a lot of mail. But these days we get more than ever. Much of it relates to student unrest,
and most of the messages are unpleasant.
Our usual practice is to thank the sender for writing and leave it at that. The combination of receiving more than 100 emails and
letters a day and recognizing that the purpose of many writers is to rebuke, rather than discuss, leaves us little choice about how
to respond.
But that certainly doesn’t mean we don’t think long and hard about the issues being raised. Some writers ask why our campus is
so focused on how “black lives matter.” Others express a mixture of curiosity and rage about microaggressions and trigger
warnings. And finally, what about those oft-criticized “safe spaces”? On this last topic, here are two stories. The first was told to
me privately by another institution’s president, and the second takes place at my institution, Northwestern University.
A group of black students were having lunch together in a campus dining hall. There were a couple of empty seats, and two
white students asked if they could join them. One of the black students asked why, in light of empty tables nearby. The reply was
that these students wanted to stretch themselves by engaging in the kind of uncomfortable learning the college encourages. The
black students politely said no. Is this really so scandalous?
I find two aspects of this story to be of particular interest.
First, the familiar question is “Why do the black students eat together in the cafeteria?” I think I have some insight on this based
on 16 years of living on or near a college campus: Many groups eat together in the cafeteria, but people seem to notice only when
the students are black. Athletes often eat with athletes; fraternity and sorority members with their Greek brothers and sisters; a
cappella group members with fellow singers; actors with actors; marching band members with marching band members; and so
on.
And that brings me to the second aspect: We all deserve safe spaces. Those black students had every right to enjoy their lunches
in peace. There are plenty of times and places to engage in uncomfortable learning, but that wasn’t one of them. The white
students, while well-meaning, didn’t have the right to unilaterally decide when uncomfortable learning would take place.
Now for the story from Northwestern. For more than four decades, we have had a building on campus called the Black House, a
space specifically meant to be a center for black student life. This summer some well-intentioned staff members suggested that
we place one of our multicultural offices there. The pushback from students, and especially alumni, was immediate and
powerful. It wasn’t until I attended a listening session that I fully understood why. One black alumna from the 1980s said that
she and her peers had fought to keep a house of their own on campus. While the black community should always have an
important voice in multicultural activities on campus, she said, we should put that office elsewhere, leaving a small house with a
proud history as a safe space exclusively for blacks.
A recent white graduate agreed. She argued that everyone needed a safe space and that for her, as a Jew, it had been the Hillel
house. She knew that when she was there, she could relax and not worry about being interrogated by non-Jews about Israeli
politics or other concerns. So why is the Black House an issue in the eyes of some alumni who write saying that we should
integrate all of our students into a single community rather than isolate them into groups? I have never gotten a single note
questioning the presence of Hillel, of our Catholic Center or any of the other safe spaces on campus.
I’m an economist, not a sociologist or psychologist, but those experts tell me that students don’t fully embrace uncomfortable
learning unless they are themselves comfortable. Safe spaces provide that comfort. The irony, it seems, is that the best hope we
have of creating an inclusive community is to first create spaces where members of each group feel safe.
I suspect this commentary will generate even more mail than usual. Let me just say in advance, thanks for writing.
Read more on this topic
Hannah Oh, Steven Glick and Taylor Schmitt: College is the last place that should be a ‘safe space’: A voice of protest against
student protests
Terrell Jermaine Starr: There’s a good reason protesters at the University of Missouri didn’t want the media around
Fay Wells: My white neighbor thought I was breaking into my own apartment. Nineteen cops showed up.
Catherine Rampell: Free speech is flunking out on college campuses
Wendy Kaminer: The progressive ideas behind the lack of free speech on campus
583 Comments
Dear Class of 2020 Student:
Welcome and congratulations on your acceptance to the College at the University of Chicago. Earning a
place in our community of scholars is no small achievement and we are delighted that you selected
Chicago to continue your intellectual journey.
Once here you will discover that one of the University of Chicago’s defining characteristics is our
commitment to freedom of inquiry and expression. This is captured in the University’s faculty report on
freedom of expression. Members of our community are encouraged to speak, write, listen, challenge
and learn, without fear of censorship. Civility and mutual respect are vital to all of us, and freedom of
expression does not mean the freedom to harass or threaten others. You will find that we expect
members of our community to be engaged in rigorous debate, discussion, and even disagreement. At
times this may challenge you and even cause discomfort.
Our commitment to academic freedom means that we do not support so-called “trigger warnings,” we
do not cancel invited speakers because their topics might prove controversial, and we do not condone
the creation of intellectual “safe spaces” where individuals can retreat from ideas and perspectives at
odds with their own.
Fostering the free exchange of ideas reinforces a related University priority—building a campus that
welcomes people of all backgrounds. Diversity of opinion and background is a fundamental strength of
our community. The members of our community must have the freedom to espouse and explore a wide
range of ideas.
I am enclosing a short monograph by Dean John W. Boyer, the Martin A. Ryerson Distinguished Service
Professor in His …
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