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Write a 750 word critical analysis. Follow APA style. Please use Citations and references. From the following choices, select one sculpture. Evaluate the sculpture using the critical analysis example at the conclusion of Chapter 3 as a guide (see below). You will need to do some research on the piece you choose in order to give the historical background, artist (if known), context, technique, etc. You will also want to refer to Chapter 3 and the accompanying PowerPoint for the technical terms and concepts necessary in the analysis(power point attache). Be sure to include all points of the outline (minimum one full page in length). Choose one of the following for this assignment:Pieta (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. by Michelangelo Buonarroti Context of Pieta, Rome: St Peter Basilica light streams (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Trajan addressing his troops (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Aldocutio) by Apollodorus of Damascus: Context of Trajan’s Column (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site., RomeThe Spoils of Jerusalem (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (from Arch of Titus)Context of Arch of Titus (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site., RomeTerracotta soldier: Soldier Horse (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Context of soldier, Lintong District, Xi’an, China: 1 terracotta army 2011 (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. Click here to see the sculptures before you visit the web pages. Be sure to include a convincing, inclusive conclusion at the end of your critical analysis and a bibliography of at least two sources that you used to prepare your analysis, one of which may be the class text. Do not use and cite Wikipedia. Instead, visit the Excelsior College Library to learn about academic sources. The page on Evaluating Information Evaluating Information (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. includes helpful sections on “Print vs. Web Resources,” Evaluation Criteria,” Evaluation Scenarios,” and “Media Literacy.”
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Module 3
Lecture Outline
Sculpture
Introduction
Sculpture has been defined
as art in three dimensions.
This means that, added to
length and width, is the
dimension of depth.
WHAT IS IT?
Sculpture may take many forms:
• Sculpture that is non-objective
• Sculpture which represents a person, animal,
plant or other object.
WHAT IS IT?
Sculpture may be used in many contexts (as
decoration, memorial, object of interest, record,
etc.) and for a variety of purposes (instructional,
inspirational, thought-provoking, etc.)
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Dimensionality
• Full Round
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Dimensionality
• Relief
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Dimensionality
• Linear
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Methods of Execution
• Subtraction (mass is removed from the original
material)
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Methods of Execution
• Construction (mass is added to the original
material)
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Methods of Execution
• Substitution (the original material is replaced)
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Methods of Execution
• Manipulation (the original material is
reconfigured)
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Elements of Composition:
• Mass. Sculpture takes up space and has density.
• Line and form. By definition, the sculpture
has form which is made up of lines in all
three dimensions.
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Elements of Composition:
• Color. Either the natural color of the
material is highlighted, or color is applied
for desired effect.
• Texture. The surface is rough or smooth.
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Principles of Composition:
• Proportion. The relationship of shapes
and forms to one another.
• Repetition. Rhythm, harmony, variation
and unity within the composition.
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Other Factors in Composition:
• Articulation. The separation of the various
parts of the composition.
• Focal areas. How the artist indicates how
and where the eye should see distinct
parts within the composition.
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Other Factors in Composition:
• Found materials. Materials not created by
the artist, but which the artist uses for
their aesthetic effect.
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Other Factors in Composition:
• Ephemeral materials. Sculpture which is
purposefully designed to be temporary.
HOW IS IT PUT TOGETHER?
Other Factors in Composition:
• Interactive compositions: meant to be
touched or manipulated by the viewer.
HOW DOES IT STIMULATE
THE SENSES?
• Touch. Is it abrasive, smooth, dry, wet?
• Temperature. Is it cold or warm?
• Age: Does it appear old, new or
weathered?
HOW DOES IT STIMULATE
THE SENSES?
• Dynamics. Does it simulate movement or
direct the eye in a particular direction?
• Size. Is it large or small, or does it seem
large or small due to perspective?
HOW DOES IT STIMULATE
THE SENSES?
• Lighting. What role does light play in
displaying the work or emphasizing
something about it?
• Environment. What role does the setting
play in displaying the work or emphasizing
something about it?
Write a 750 word critical analysis. Follow APA style. Please use Citations and
references.
From the following choices, select one sculpture. Evaluate the sculpture using the
critical analysis example at the conclusion of Chapter 3 as a guide (see below). You will
need to do some research on the piece you choose in order to give the historical
background, artist (if known), context, technique, etc. You will also want to refer to
Chapter 3 and the accompanying PowerPoint for the technical terms and concepts
necessary in the analysis(power point attache). Be sure to include all points of the
outline (minimum one full page in length). Choose one of the following for this
assignment:






Pieta (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. by Michelangelo Buonarroti
Context of Pieta, Rome: St Peter Basilica light streams (Links to an external
site.)Links to an external site.
(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Trajan addressing his
troops (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Aldocutio) by Apollodorus
of Damascus:
Context of Trajan’s Column (Links to an external site.)Links to an external
site., Rome
The Spoils of Jerusalem (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (from
Arch of Titus)
Context of Arch of Titus (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site., Rome
Terracotta soldier: Soldier Horse (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
Context of soldier, Lintong District, Xi’an, China: 1 terracotta army 2011 (Links to an
external site.)Links to an external site.
Click here to see the sculptures before you visit the web pages. Be sure to include
a convincing, inclusive conclusion at the end of your critical analysis and a bibliography
of at least two sources that you used to prepare your analysis, one of which may be the
class text. Do not use and cite Wikipedia. Instead, visit the Excelsior College Library to
learn about academic sources. The page on Evaluating Information Evaluating
Information (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. includes helpful sections
on “Print vs. Web Resources,” Evaluation Criteria,” Evaluation Scenarios,” and “Media
Literacy.”
Write a 750 word critical analysis. Follow APA style
Critical Analysis example
Sample Outline and Critical Analysis
The following very brief example illustrates how we can use some of the terms
explained in the chapter to form an outline and then develop a critical analysis of a work
of art. Here is how an outline might appear regarding Michelangelo’s
sculpture, David (see Fig. 3.8).
Outline
Critical Analysis
Dimensionality
full round
Michelangelo’s David is a full round work standing 18 feet above the floor. Its
larger-than-life size contributes to its sense of heroic grandeur. Much of its
effect depends on the bulging muscles, exaggerated rib cage, heavy hair,
undercut eyes, and frowning brow, all of which seem intended to allow the
work’s details to be seen from a distance.
Method of
execution:
subtraction
Using a subtractive method, Michelangelo carved the work out of marble, a
metamorphic rock that provided a workable basis for the finely polished finish
and carefully executed details. As a result, the stone has
Texture
the smooth texture of skin—of real flesh stretched over taut but pliable
musculature. Each detail has a subtlety and smoothness that seem to
breathe.
Scale
The size (scale) and proportions of the work give it great mass, which in turn
creates a sense of awe in the viewer, compared to the same work were it life
size. Michelangelo’s use of line provides a complex set of stimuli in which the
work seems to be self-contained while at the same time wanting to escape its
space. The downward stare of the eyes directs the viewer to the hand
containing the sling, which drapes over David’s back. Then the viewer’s eye
travels down the arm and pauses at the elbow, perhaps not sure if it wants to
move back into the space occupied by the statue or off into the adjacent
space where Goliath awaits. The same can be said of the work’s line as it
moves down the body’s left leg to the ground and either off into space or back
to the right leg along the rocky ground. The positioning of the right arm, with
the hand canted in to the thigh, again sets up a circular direction, keeping the
viewer’s attention inside the space of the statue. The line moves across the
lower thigh across the incidental negative space between the legs and seems
to engage an implied line moving from the extended elbow that takes the
viewer’s eye upward to the focal point of the work—David’s heroic face. The
statue appears full of dynamic tension, and yet seems comfortably stable.
Mass
Line
Negative space
Focal point
Write a 750 word critical analysis. Follow APA style. Please use Citations and
references.
From the following choices, select one sculpture. Evaluate the sculpture using the
critical analysis example at the conclusion of Chapter 3 as a guide (see below). You will
need to do some research on the piece you choose in order to give the historical
background, artist (if known), context, technique, etc. You will also want to refer to
Chapter 3 and the accompanying PowerPoint for the technical terms and concepts
necessary in the analysis(power point attached). Be sure to include all points of the
outline (minimum one full page in length). Choose one of the following for this
assignment:






Pieta (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. by Michelangelo Buonarroti
Context of Pieta, Rome: St Peter Basilica light streams (Links to an external
site.)Links to an external site.
(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Trajan addressing his
troops (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Aldocutio) by Apollodorus
of Damascus:
Context of Trajan’s Column (Links to an external site.)Links to an external
site., Rome
The Spoils of Jerusalem (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (from
Arch of Titus)
Context of Arch of Titus (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site., Rome
Terracotta soldier: Soldier Horse (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
Context of soldier, Lintong District, Xi’an, China: 1 terracotta army 2011 (Links to an
external site.)Links to an external site.
Click here to see the sculptures before you visit the web pages. Be sure to include
a convincing, inclusive conclusion at the end of your critical analysis and a bibliography
of at least two sources that you used to prepare your analysis, one of which may be the
class text. Do not use and cite Wikipedia.
Write a 750 word critical analysis. Follow APA style
Critical Analysis example
Sample Outline and Critical Analysis
The following very brief example illustrates how we can use some of the terms
explained in the chapter to form an outline and then develop a critical analysis of a work
of art. Here is how an outline might appear regarding Michelangelo’s
sculpture, David (see Fig. 3.8).
Outline
Critical Analysis
Dimensionality
full round
Michelangelo’s David is a full round work standing 18 feet above the floor. Its
larger-than-life size contributes to its sense of heroic grandeur. Much of its
effect depends on the bulging muscles, exaggerated rib cage, heavy hair,
undercut eyes, and frowning brow, all of which seem intended to allow the
work’s details to be seen from a distance.
Method of
execution:
subtraction
Using a subtractive method, Michelangelo carved the work out of marble, a
metamorphic rock that provided a workable basis for the finely polished finish
and carefully executed details. As a result, the stone has
Texture
the smooth texture of skin—of real flesh stretched over taut but pliable
musculature. Each detail has a subtlety and smoothness that seem to
breathe.
Scale
The size (scale) and proportions of the work give it great mass, which in turn
creates a sense of awe in the viewer, compared to the same work were it life
size. Michelangelo’s use of line provides a complex set of stimuli in which the
work seems to be self-contained while at the same time wanting to escape its
space. The downward stare of the eyes directs the viewer to the hand
containing the sling, which drapes over David’s back. Then the viewer’s eye
travels down the arm and pauses at the elbow, perhaps not sure if it wants to
move back into the space occupied by the statue or off into the adjacent
space where Goliath awaits. The same can be said of the work’s line as it
moves down the body’s left leg to the ground and either off into space or back
to the right leg along the rocky ground. The positioning of the right arm, with
the hand canted in to the thigh, again sets up a circular direction, keeping the
viewer’s attention inside the space of the statue. The line moves across the
lower thigh across the incidental negative space between the legs and seems
to engage an implied line moving from the extended elbow that takes the
viewer’s eye upward to the focal point of the work—David’s heroic face. The
statue appears full of dynamic tension, and yet seems comfortably stable.
Mass
Line
Negative space
Focal point
Write a 750 word critical analysis. Follow APA style. Please use Citations and
references.
From the following choices, select one sculpture. Evaluate the sculpture using the
critical analysis example at the conclusion of Chapter 3 as a guide (see below). You will
need to do some research on the piece you choose in order to give the historical
background, artist (if known), context, technique, etc. You will also want to refer to
Chapter 3 and the accompanying PowerPoint for the technical terms and concepts
necessary in the analysis(power point attached). Be sure to include all points of the
outline (minimum one full page in length). Choose one of the following for this
assignment:






Pieta (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. by Michelangelo Buonarroti
Context of Pieta, Rome: St Peter Basilica light streams (Links to an external
site.)Links to an external site.
(Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.Trajan addressing his
troops (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (Aldocutio) by Apollodorus
of Damascus:
Context of Trajan’s Column (Links to an external site.)Links to an external
site., Rome
The Spoils of Jerusalem (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site. (from
Arch of Titus)
Context of Arch of Titus (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site., Rome
Terracotta soldier: Soldier Horse (Links to an external site.)Links to an external site.
Context of soldier, Lintong District, Xi’an, China: 1 terracotta army 2011 (Links to an
external site.)Links to an external site.
Click here to see the sculptures before you visit the web pages. Be sure to include
a convincing, inclusive conclusion at the end of your critical analysis and a bibliography
of at least two sources that you used to prepare your analysis, one of which may be the
class text. Do not use and cite Wikipedia.
Write a 750 word critical analysis. Follow APA style
Critical Analysis example
Sample Outline and Critical Analysis
The following very brief example illustrates how we can use some of the terms
explained in the chapter to form an outline and then develop a critical analysis of a work
of art. Here is how an outline might appear regarding Michelangelo’s
sculpture, David (see Fig. 3.8).
Outline
Critical Analysis
Dimensionality
full round
Michelangelo’s David is a full round work standing 18 feet above the floor. Its
larger-than-life size contributes to its sense of heroic grandeur. Much of its
effect depends on the bulging muscles, exaggerated rib cage, heavy hair,
undercut eyes, and frowning brow, all of which seem intended to allow the
work’s details to be seen from a distance.
Method of
execution:
subtraction
Using a subtractive method, Michelangelo carved the work out of marble, a
metamorphic rock that provided a workable basis for the finely polished finish
and carefully executed details. As a result, the stone has
Texture
the smooth texture of skin—of real flesh stretched over taut but pliable
musculature. Each detail has a subtlety and smoothness that seem to
breathe.
Scale
The size (scale) and proportions of the work give it great mass, which in turn
creates a sense of awe in the viewer, compared to the same work were it life
size. Michelangelo’s use of line provides a complex set of stimuli in which the
work seems to be self-contained while at the same time wanting to escape its
space. The downward stare of the eyes directs the viewer to the hand
containing the sling, which drapes over David’s back. Then the viewer’s eye
travels down the arm and pauses at the elbow, perhaps not sure if it wants to
move back into the space occupied by the statue or off into the adjacent
space where Goliath awaits. The same can be said of the work’s line as it
moves down the body’s left leg to the ground and either off into space or back
to the right leg along the rocky ground. The positioning of the right arm, with
the hand canted in to the thigh, again sets up a circular direction, keeping the
viewer’s attention inside the space of the statue. The line moves across the
lower thigh across the incidental negative space between the legs and seems
to engage an implied line moving from the extended elbow that takes the
viewer’s eye upward to the focal point of the work—David’s heroic face. The
statue appears full of dynamic tension, and yet seems comfortably stable.
Mass
Line
Negative space
Focal point

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