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This essay requires watching a movie and taking notes. and requires to talk about a specific topic on the documentary and i was think you could write about the statistics on college loans. and I have an article you could read and add it to the essay. Project # 3 Prompt: Analyzing Rhetorical Conventions Across Genres Assignment: During the past two months, we have focused extensively on the idea of “safe spaces” in colleges campus. Moreover, we have looked at several written texts for their claims, evidence, and rhetorical strategies and analyzed how these academic texts advance their arguments. Not only have you analyzed one text for the author’s choices, but your last paper called on you to synthesize two academic texts. Now, we will turn our attention to analyzing one academic text and one alternate form of media. For this assignment, we will watch the documentary, Ivory Tower (2014) by Andrew Rossi. In the documentary, Rossi explores the value of a college education considering the ever-rising costs and offers insight into various forms of higher education. Your goal for this assignment is to identify Rossi’s overall argument, claims that he makes in order to advance his argument, the evidence he provides, and the rhetorical moves he makes to persuade the reader. Then, you will be responsible for locating one outside text—found on SDSU’s Library Database—that relates the argument being made in the documentary. You can find a text that agrees with Rossi’s stance, disagrees, qualifies, or illustrates the argument being made. Just like the last paper, your goal is to effectively synthesize the two genres and offer analysis on how they each present their argument. _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Goals: Watch documentary, take extensive notes on overall argument, claims, evidence, and rhetorical strategiesLocate an academic text that relates to the topic at hand—cost of college & value of a degree—and also identify the overall argument, claims, evidence, and rhetorical strategies Begin finding areas where the documentary and written text agree, disagree, or use similar/different rhetorical strategiesPut the two media “in conversation” and analyze the effectiveness of their choicesDevelop an essay between 4-5 pages _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Guidelines: Intro: strong hook, background context on your selected topic, introduce authors & texts, road map of your analysis, thesis Body (within each body paragraph): provide an account of each author’s central claims and explain how these claims strengthen the author’s main idea describe some of the rhetorical strategies both authors use, provide interpretation and analysis of how these strategies work, and explain the impact of these decisions in relation to the author’s purpose and audience analyze rhetorical strategies evaluate how effectively or ineffectively the author uses said rhetorical strategies Conclusion: offer a conclusion that is not merely repetitive, but instead offers insight into the significance of the topic as a whole MLA 8 Works Cited _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Evaluation Criteria: ComprehensionDevelopmentDetails/analyzes chosen texts thoroughly and thoughtfullyWriter thoroughly address elements of the argument, including author, context, audience, purpose, claims, and evidence.Analysis of rhetorical strategies is thorough OrganizationExpression/Mechanics/Grammar _______________________________________________________________________________________________ Important Dates: 03.19: Discussion of Prompt; Practice; Brainstorming; Contextual Videos 03.26: Watch Documentary; Locate Secondary Text 04.02: Spring Break—Draft your Essay 04.09: In-class Peer Review 04.16: Conferencing—You will meet with either me or Gaby for a 10-minute one-on-one meeting to discuss your essay04.23: Final Essay Due SLOs: Develop an effective process of reading for comprehension Develop an effective writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revision, and self-evaluation Analyze the elements of academic texts—particularly argument, genre, audience, context, purpose, and strategies Articulate in writing key rhetorical concepts.https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=v-Fj5wivD8Mhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GwXDnhjjNJEhttps://www.youtube.com/watch?v=P8pjd1QEA0chttp://www.documentarymania.com/player.php?title=Ivory%20Tower
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DUE APRIL 23RD on BLACKBOARD BY MIDNIGHT
PROJECT # 3 PROMPT: ANALYZING
RHETORICAL CONVENTIONS
ACROSS GENRES
ASSIGNMENT:
During the past two months, we have focused extensively on the idea of “safe spaces”
in colleges campus. Moreover, we have looked at several written texts for their claims,
evidence, and rhetorical strategies and analyzed how these academic texts advance
their arguments. Not only have you analyzed one text for the author’s choices, but your
last paper called on you to synthesize two academic texts. Now, we will turn our
attention to analyzing one academic text and one alternate form of media.
For this assignment, we will watch the documentary, Ivory Tower (2014) by Andrew Rossi. In the documentary, Rossi
explores the value of a college education considering the ever-rising costs and offers insight into various forms of
higher education.
Your goal for this assignment is to identify Rossi’s overall argument, claims that he makes in order to advance his
argument, the evidence he provides, and the rhetorical moves he makes to persuade the reader.
Then, you will be responsible for locating one outside text—found on SDSU’s Library Database—that relates the
argument being made in the documentary. You can find a text that agrees with Rossi’s stance, disagrees, qualifies,
or illustrates the argument being made.
Just like the last paper, your goal is to effectively synthesize the two genres and offer analysis on how they each
present their argument.
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
GOALS:





Watch documentary, take extensive notes on overall argument, claims, evidence, and rhetorical strategies
Locate an academic text that relates to the topic at hand—cost of college & value of a degree—and also
identify the overall argument, claims, evidence, and rhetorical strategies
Begin finding areas where the documentary and written text agree, disagree, or use similar/different
rhetorical strategies
Put the two media “in conversation” and analyze the effectiveness of their choices
Develop an essay between 4-5 pages
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
GUIDELINES:
1.
Intro:
a.
strong hook, background context on your selected topic, introduce authors & texts, road map of
your analysis, thesis
DUE APRIL 23RD on BLACKBOARD BY MIDNIGHT
2.
Body (within each body paragraph):
a. provide an account of each author’s central claims and explain how these claims strengthen the
author’s main idea
b. describe some of the rhetorical strategies both authors use, provide interpretation and analysis of
how these strategies work, and explain the impact of these decisions in relation to the author’s
purpose and audience
c. analyze rhetorical strategies
d. evaluate how effectively or ineffectively the author uses said rhetorical strategies
3.
Conclusion:
a. offer a conclusion that is not merely repetitive, but instead offers insight into the significance of
the topic as a whole
4. MLA 8 Works Cited
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
EVALUATION CRITERIA:
→ Comprehension
o Effectively addresses all aspects of the prompt
o Fully grasps both articles and showcases knowledge cogently
→ Development
o Details/analyzes chosen texts thoroughly and thoughtfully
o Writer thoroughly address elements of the argument, including author, context, audience,
purpose, claims, and evidence.
o Analysis of rhetorical strategies is thorough
→ Organization
o Essay flows logically from introduction → body → conclusion
o Sentence level organization is strong
→ Expression/Mechanics/Grammar
_______________________________________________________________________________________________
IMPORTANT DATES:






03.19: Discussion of Prompt; Practice; Brainstorming; Contextual Videos
03.26: Watch Documentary; Locate Secondary Text
04.02: Spring Break—Draft your Essay
04.09: In-class Peer Review
04.16: Conferencing—You will meet with either me or Gaby for a 10-minute one-on-one meeting to
discuss your essay
04.23: Final Essay Due
SLOS:
→ Develop an effective process of reading for comprehension
→ Develop an effective writing process—including prewriting, drafting, revision, and self-evaluation
→ Analyze the elements of academic texts—particularly argument, genre, audience, context, purpose, and
strategies
→ Articulate in writing key rhetorical concepts.
RWS 280 Essay Three Structure Outline
Complete draft between weeks 10-11
Introduction
Hook:
Transition into Context:
Transition & Introduce documentary:
Connect to Academic Text:
Transition to RoadMap for Essay:
Thesis:
RWS 280 Essay Three Structure Outline
Complete draft between weeks 10-11
Body
Topic Sentence:
Evidence from 1st Documentary: According to _____________, “____________________” (Citation).
Analysis of Evidence:
Analyze Rhetorical Strategy & Evaluate Effectiveness:
Synthesis of 2nd Text: (Ex. In addition, similarly, on the other hand, also, etc.)
Evidence from 2nd Text: According to _____________, “____________________” (Citation).
Analysis of Evidence:
Analyze Rhetorical Strategy & Evaluate Effectiveness:
RWS 280 Essay Three Structure Outline
Complete draft between weeks 10-11
Evaluation of Documentary vs Academic Text:
Body
Topic Sentence
Evidence from 1st Documentary: According to _____________, “____________________” (Citation).
Analysis of Evidence:
Analyze Rhetorical Strategy & Evaluate Effectiveness:
Synthesis of Academic Text: (Ex. In addition, similarly, on the other hand, also, etc.)
Evidence from 2nd Text: According to _____________, “____________________” (Citation).
RWS 280 Essay Three Structure Outline
Complete draft between weeks 10-11
Analysis of Evidence:
Analyze Rhetorical Strategy & Evaluate Effectiveness:
Evaluation of Documentary vs Academic Text:
Conclusion
Brief Recap (signal to your reader that you are coming to a close)
Point to a Larger Significance:
Final Thoughts: (personal thoughts, call to action, solution, etc.)
(Ivory Tower) Rhetorical Situation:
Author:
Audience:
Purpose:
Context:
Genre:
Major Claim:
Evidence:
Rhetorical Strategy:
Evidence:
Rhetorical Strategy:
Evidence:
Rhetorical Strategy:
Major Claim:
Evidence:
Rhetorical Strategy:
Evidence:
Rhetorical Strategy:
Evidence:
Rhetorical Strategy:
Evaluation: (effective, ineffective, relevant, irrelevant, convincing, not convincing, etc.)
(Academic Text) Rhetorical Situation:
Author:
Audience:
Purpose:
Context:
Genre:
Major Claim:
Evidence:
Rhetorical Strategy:
Evidence:
Rhetorical Strategy:
Evidence:
Rhetorical Strategy:
Major Claim:
Evidence:
Rhetorical Strategy:
Evidence:
Rhetorical Strategy:
Evidence:
Rhetorical Strategy:
Evaluation: (effective, ineffective, relevant, irrelevant, convincing, not convincing, etc.)
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College Tuition and Student Loans
Opposing Viewpoints Online Collection. 2018. Lexile Measure: 1510L.
COPYRIGHT 2019 Gale, a Cengage Company
From Opposing Viewpoints In Context.
Full Text:
College tuition is the monetary amount paid by students to receive instruction from an institution of higher learning. The average cost of tuition
and required fees per academic year at degree-granting colleges and universities in the United States increased dramatically between the
1997–1998 and 2017–2018 academic years. According to a report from the College Board, when adjusted for inflation, annual tuition and fees for
in-state students at four-year public universities rose by 110 percent during that period, from $4,740 to $9,970. Meanwhile, average tuition and
fees at four-year private nonprofit institutions grew by 65 percent, from $21,020 to $34,740 per year.
Students who are unable to afford the full cost of tuition and other expenses—such as food, housing, transportation, books, and supplies—may
qualify for financial aid. Financial aid encompasses grants and scholarships (known as gift aid because the money does not have to be repaid), as
well as paid campus employment (work-study aid) and loans. Education loans, also known as student loans, are funds that students borrow to pay
for education-related expenses and are obligated to repay, usually with interest. Students may receive financial aid from federal or state
government agencies, the educational institutions they attend, or private sources. According to the National Center for Education Statistics, 86
percent of newly enrolled, full-time undergraduate students at four-year colleges and universities received financial aid in the academic year
2014–2015.
The rapid rise in tuition costs has contributed to the accumulation of $1.4 trillion in total student loan debt in the United States, which ranks ahead
of total credit card debt and second only to total mortgage debt as a source of financial obligation. According to a report from credit reporting
agency Experian, as of 2017, the average outstanding student loan balance among recent college graduates was over $34,000—an increase of 62
percent from a decade earlier. Many college graduates struggle for decades to pay off their student loans, which may prevent them from achieving
other financial goals, such as buying a home, starting a family, or saving for retirement. As of 2016, more than 4.2 million borrowers were in
default on their student loans, which represented an increase of 15 percent from the previous year.
Rising Tuition Rates
Tuition rates vary widely by state and academic institution. According to the College Board, the lowest average rates for in-state undergraduate
students at public four-year institutions as of 2017 could be found in Wyoming ($5,220 per academic year) and Florida ($6,360). The states with
the highest average tuition rates for in-state students were Vermont and New Hampshire, with annual costs of more than $16,000. Out-of-state
students were charged the lowest tuition rates by public universities in South Dakota ($12,480) and Wyoming ($16,830), while they paid the
highest average rates in Michigan ($36,840) and Vermont ($38,990). Private nonprofit colleges and universities tend to charge higher tuition rates
than public institutions. Columbia University in New York City, for example, had the highest published tuition and fees of any American school
for the 2017–2018 school year at $57,208.
Some analysts attribute the rise in tuition rates to an increase in demand for college education, as more young people come to believe that they
need at least a bachelor’s degree in order to achieve their career goals and increase their earning potential. Others point to the pressure academic
institutions face to achieve excellence in instruction, facilities, and research, which results in spending to hire new staff, expand programs, renovate
facilities, and improve student services. In addition, many institutions have increased the amount of financial aid they offer to attract high-quality
students, while many states have reduced the amount of funding they provide to colleges.
Some economists claim that US government subsidies for education loan programs have contributed to the steep rise in tuition rates. The federal
Parent PLUS program, for instance, allows families to borrow amounts up to the student’s total cost of attendance at a college or university, which
creates incentives for schools to increase tuition rates. The Parent PLUS program accounted for 20 percent of undergraduate education loans in
2016, with the average recipient borrowing $14,000 per academic year. Some experts argue that if parents had to obtain educational loans from
private lenders, which would be more discriminating about the value of education, then it would force academic institutions to keep tuition rates in
check.
Financial Aid and Education Loans
The first step in applying for financial aid is to complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA), which is used by the US
government, state governments, and colleges and universities to determine students’ eligibility to receive need-based aid. Based on financial
information provided in the FAFSA, students receive a personalized report with their Expected Family Contribution (EFC), which is a measure of
their ability to pay college expenses. The EFC is subtracted from the total cost of attendance at a specific college or university to determine the
amount of financial aid a student is eligible to receive at that school.
Students may also qualify for gift aid in the form of grants or scholarships. The federal government awards grants to students with the greatest
financial need through the Pell Grant and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) programs. Academic institutions
sometimes offer grants as well. Scholarships are available from many sources, including federal and state agencies, academic institutions,
charitable foundations, corporations, professional groups, chambers of commerce, and social or religious organizations. Most scholarships are
awarded competitively based on students’ academic or athletic performance, leadership, or community service activities. American colleges and
universities and the US Department of Education combine to offer students approximately $46 billion in grants and scholarships each year, while
private sources account for another $3.3 billion in annual gift aid.
Experts recommend that students exhaust all potential sources of gift aid before taking out student loans, which must be repaid with interest over
time. The federal government offers two main types of education loans: subsidized and unsubsidized. Subsidized loans are awarded based on
financial need and do not accrue interest while the student is enrolled in school at least half-time. Examples include the Federal Perkins Loan,
which provided up to $5,500 per year for undergraduate students in 2016 and featured a six-month, interest-free grace period following graduation,
and the Direct Subsidized Loan (known as a Stafford loan), which provided an amount determined by the school and did not feature a grace period.
Unsubsidized loans are available to students or their parents regardless of financial need, but interest accrues throughout the time the student
attends college.
Education loans are also available from banks, credit card companies, and other private sources. Federal loans offer advantages, however, such as
lower interest rates that are fixed for the term of the loan, deferment options for students who return to school, flexible repayment plans based on
borrowers’ income, and loan forgiveness for graduates who perform certain types of public service or are employed in certain occupations. Unlike
other forms of debt, student loans cannot be discharged through bankruptcy, except in rare cases of undue hardship.
The Student Debt Crisis
The increasing reliance on borrowing to pay the rising costs of higher education has created a student debt crisis in the United States. A 2017 Pew
Research survey found that 37 percent of American adults under age thirty had student loan debt. Although a college education is generally viewed
as an investment in the future because it prepares students for higher paying jobs, only 51 percent of young professionals with student debt said the
benefits of education outweighed the costs. The young people who had student debt were twice as likely to work multiple jobs and half as likely to
say they were living comfortably as those who did not have education loans.
In a poll of 3,000 young professionals with student loan debt, 80 percent indicated that the financial challenge of paying off education loans was a
significant source of stress, with 60 percent of respondents reporting such stress-related symptoms as headaches, loss of sleep, and nightmares.
Loan payments also impacted their quality of life by making it difficult to afford vacations, entertainment, and even necessities like rent and
clothing.
The student debt crisis tends to be most severe for people who remain in school for many years to earn advanced degrees. The median amount
borrowed to finance a postgraduate degree was $45,000, compared to $25,000 for a bachelor’s degree. Regionally, people who live on the East
Coast carry more student debt than those in other parts of the country. Women account for two-thirds of the total outstanding student debt in the
United States, or $833 billion in 2017. Women are more likely to attend college than men, as well as more likely to need loans to finance their
education, although they tend to earn less once they are employed.
College Affordability in the Future
Many individuals and organizations have floated proposals aimed at making college more affordable, enabling students to earn a college degree
without accumulating debt, and easing the burden of student debt faced by millions of Americans. Proponents of these plans argue that higher
education is a public good that should be accessible to any qualified person, regardless of their financial circumstances. They assert that an
educated workforce creates prosperity for all Americans by improving US competitiveness in the global economy.
Democratic presidential candidates Hillary Clinton and Bernie Sanders, for instance, both included plans to reduce tuition rates and relieve student
debt in their 2016 campaign platforms. Clinton’s plan promoted free tuition at community colleges, limiting student loan payments to 10 percent
of income, and forgiving education debts after twenty years. Sanders suggested eliminating tuition at all public four-year colleges and universities
through a combination of federal and state financing. Advocates of these plans noted that several other countries successfully provide tuition-free
higher education, including Denmark, Germany, and Sweden. Critics of these plans argued that providing new sources of government funding for
higher education would make college less affordable by creating further incentives for academic institutions to increase the cost of room, board,
and non-tuition fees. Further criticisms leveled against such plans claimed that they would divert federal funding from other pressing issues, raise
taxes, hurt private institutions, and encourage students to pursue majors and programs that do not translate to employment.
Source Citation (MLA 8th Edition)
“College Tuition and Student Loans.” Opposing Viewpoints Online Collection, Gale, 2018. Opposing Viewpoints in Context,
http://link.galegroup.com/apps/doc/PC3010999071/OVIC?u=san96005&sid=OVIC&xid=7e6aee2e. Accessed 27 Mar. 2019.
Gale Document Number: GALE|PC3010999071

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