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Evaluate about the hiring process of the Minneapolis Police Department. Included are notes that I took, please use some of these notes as well as some of your own. For the criteria that needs to be discussed please see below:

1.Should we do background checks 

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2. Should we ask questions in the interview about their management of anger and controversial topics

3. what does the literature (policy or documents) say is a good way of doing the hiring process so that you don’t get those people who are involved in police brutality or bad officers in general

4. what is the protocol for getting rid of/suspending officers who have performed misconduct

assignment should be at least 3 pages

1. what is the protocol for getting rid of/suspending officers who have performed misconduct

· THE MINNEAPOLIS POLICE DEPARTMENT is notoriously ineffective at removing bad cops from its ranks.

· Numerous lawsuits, independent investigations and the disciplinary files obtained by the Reformer show a pattern of mismanagement when it comes to holding officers accountable.

· Department leaders are routinely blind to numerous warning signs that problem officers pose a danger to the public.

Max Nesterak, M. R. D. 15. (2021, October 7). The bad cops: How Minneapolis protects its worst police officers until it’s too late. Minnesota Reformer. Retrieved April 2, 2022, from https://minnesotareformer.com/2020/12/15/the-bad-cops-how-minneapolis-protects-its-worst-police-officers-until-its-too-late/

(Max Nesterak, 2021)

2. should we do background checks

· Only when officers commit the most egregious acts of abuse – are they removed from the force

· Chief Art Knight was demoted from deputy chief later this year after another instance of being too frank, when he warned that unless the department changed its recruiting practices, it would wind up with “the same old white boys.”

Max Nesterak, M. R. D. 15. (2021, October 7). The bad cops: How Minneapolis protects its worst police officers until it’s too late. Minnesota Reformer. Retrieved April 2, 2022, from https://minnesotareformer.com/2020/12/15/the-bad-cops-how-minneapolis-protects-its-worst-police-officers-until-its-too-late/

(Max Nesterak, 2021)

· Peter Brazeau and Alexander Brown were both relieved of duty for the severe beating of a intoxicated patron in handcuffs in 2016. Unfortunately, the MPD not only put them back to work, the department also made them field training officers — FTOs.

· Having cops with records of misconduct train new generations of recruits is all too common for the MPD.

· Of the more than 400 Minneapolis cops who have served as FTOs since 2016, nearly a third of them – like Brazeau and Brown — have been disciplined or named in lawsuits that have cost taxpayers more than $34 million, a KARE 11 investigation has found.

· The most well-known case of such an officer was Derek Chauvin, one of the MPD’s most prolific trainers before murdering George Floyd.

· Chauvin continued as an FTO even though records show in 2017 he had beaten a 14-year-old boy and held him down with a knee on his back.

· FTOs do more than train new recruits, said Randy Shrewsberry of the Institute for Criminal Justice Reform. They create a culture. And if they have histories of misconduct, “They’re just passing those bad habits or those very dangerous viewpoints onto another officer and then it becomes kind of this vicious cycle,” Shrewsberry said.

(KARE11), B. S. (2022, February 24). Kare 11 investigates: Nearly 150 MPD cops with misconduct history served as trainers. kare11.com. Retrieved April 1, 2022, from https://www.kare11.com/article/news/investigations/kare-11-investigates-nearly-150-mpd-cops-with-misconduct-history-served-as-trainers/89-29969f7c-e52a-4b6a-bd49-b6a08dddbe05

(KARE11, 2022)

· New complaints of misconduct against the Minneapolis Police Department hit a record high in 2018, jumping 41.5% to 569 from 402 in the year prior, according to the city’s most recent Comprehensive Annual Financial Report.

Smith, K. (2020, June 4). Minneapolis police misconduct complaints hit a record high in 2018. CBS News. Retrieved April 1, 2022, from https://www.cbsnews.com/news/minneapolis-police-misconduct-complaints-record-high-2018/

(Smith, 2020)

3. should we ask questions in the interview about their management of anger

· Like most police departments in the United States, Minneapolis requires job applicants to go through a psychological screening before they’re hired (Max Nesterak, 2021).

· To improve the screening process, one former FBI agent is developing a polygraph test specifically aimed at detecting prospective hires who have racist tendencies.

· Others stress the need to revamp the entire hiring process to weed out those who might use excessive force, especially against Black males.

· The Minnesota Board of Peace Officer Standards and Training, which oversees the licensing of officers is lobbying for federal approval to conduct criminal history checks on recruits, among other reforms, said interim director Erik Misselt. Checks are currently handled by local police departments.

· But the sense of urgency in tightening up the recruitment process has ratcheted higher since the death of George Floyd

· Background investigators have also become adept at reviewing social media posts and body ink — two of the most prevalent tools for unearthing biases or affiliation with hate groups.

· James Stern, a retired FBI agent, believes there is a way to test for racial animus.

· With questions like “Do you discriminate against people of color” and “Have you ever committed an act of violence against someone based on their ethnicity,” he developed a polygraph test aimed at detecting bias and prior commission of hate crimes.

· “Anyone who is a racist or anti other groups, or who has the propensity to violate civil rights — not all of them are overt,” said James Stern a retired FBI agent

· “A specific-issue polygraph examination would wash out a lot of those people.” said James Stern a retired FBI agent

Layne, N. (2020, July 17). In wake of Floyd killing, screening of U.S. police recruits is under focus. Reuters. Retrieved April 1, 2022, from https://www.reuters.com/article/us-global-race-usa-policing/in-wake-of-floyd-killing-screening-of-u-s-police-recruits-is-under-focus-idUSKCN24I2O4

(Layne, 2020)

what does the literature say is a good way of doing the hiring process so that you don’t get those people

· The president of the Minneapolis City Council quickly called for better psychological testing of police officers.

· Research shows that some psychological tests can detect which officers are mentally equipped for the responsibility of making life-and-death decisions.

· Minneapolis is now poised to replace Gratzer — Gratzer screened out a larger percentage of minority applicants, which alarmed them.

· Ironically Gratzer, who did not respond to four interview requests, came into the job after the city fired two of his predecessors over concerns they rejected too many minority candidates.

Gilbert, C. (2022, January 7). Minneapolis police recruits get less psychological testing than they used to. Minimizing Mental Fitness | APM Reports. Retrieved April 1, 2022, from https://www.apmreports.org/story/2017/12/14/minneapolis-police-recruits-psychological-testing

(Gilbert, 2022)

· With only one test, Mike Roberts, a psychologist in the San Francisco Bay Area said, there’s risk the screening could miss characteristics that would indicate that an officer shouldn’t carry a badge and gun.

· For the past five years, Minneapolis has administered only one test, the MMPI-II-RF, which is focused on the applicant’s mental stability. The city hasn’t included any formal testing of whether candidates are psychologically suitable.

· “Abnormal range” personality tests like the MMPI-II-RF, focus on traits that border on pathological, including anxiety, hostility and rebelliousness. By contrast, “normal range” tests, such as the California Personality Inventory, are designed to measure positive traits such as sociability, conscientiousness and integrity.

· Recent research shows that using both tests together is more effective at identifying problem officers than using either test in isolation. APM Reports surveyed seven cities similar to Minneapolis, including St. Paul, Seattle, Miami and Denver. Minneapolis was the only city relying on a single test.

· Up until 2012, Minneapolis put applicants through as many as five tests.

· A 2004 study, funded by the U.S. Department of Justice, found that Minneapolis officers who were flagged as a concern during their psychological assessments were three times more likely to engage in misconduct on the force

· In Minneapolis, candidates must pass a series of interviews, physical agility challenges and a background check before that happens, but no formal assessments of their personality, character or intelligence.

· Under the Americans with Disabilities Act, police departments can only require candidates to undergo a full psychological evaluation after giving them a conditional job offer.

Gilbert, C. (2022, January 7). Minneapolis police recruits get less psychological testing than they used to. Minimizing Mental Fitness | APM Reports. Retrieved April 1, 2022, from https://www.apmreports.org/story/2017/12/14/minneapolis-police-recruits-psychological-testing

(Gilbert, 2022)

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