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This assignment builds on your first assignment. We are going to investigate the food you ate in greater detail focusing on nutrition labeling and the macro-nutrients you have learned about in the last few weeks. For this assignment, you will complete the attached worksheet using your food record and your Food Details Report from Assignment 1. See attachments
assignment_2_worksheet.docx

nutrient_report_1.pdf

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nutrient_report_2.pdf

nutrient_report_3.pdf

eating_history_report.pdf

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SPHE295
Assignment 2
For this Assignment, you will use your food record and Food Group and Nutrient Reports from
Assignment 1.
Part I. Sources of your food selections:
Use your food record from Assignment 1 to answer the following questions.
1) How many foods were processed? A process food is packaged by a manufacturer, for example
cracker, cereal, chips, rice mixes, soups frozen dinners, etc. Processed foods have a Nutrition Facts
label.
Day
1
2
3
Total (Add up
the 3 days)
Number of
Processed Foods
2) How many foods did you prepare and/or cook? Examples of these types of foods are homemade
lasagna, plain cooked pork chops, and cooked vegetables.
Day
1
2
3
Total (Add up
the 3 days)
Number of Prepared
Foods
3) How many foods were not prepared or processed? Examples of these types of foods would be milk,
orange, banana, raw vegetables, salad (dressing would be processed), etc.
Day
1
2
3
Total (Add up
the 3 days)
Number of
Unprocessed Foods
4) How many foods were prepared by somebody else, for example at a restaurant?
Day
1
2
3
Total (Add up
the 3 days)
Number of Food
Prepared by
Someone Else
5) What percent of the foods you ate were processed, prepared by you or someone else, or
unprocessed/unprepared?
+
Total
Processed
Foods
+
Total Prepared
Foods
+
Total Foods
Prepared by
Someone Else
=
Total
Unprocessed/Unprepa
red Foods
Add these 4
together for Total
Foods
a) Percent Processed Foods:
Total Processed Foods
Total Foods
* 100=
%
* 100=
%
b) Percent Prepared Foods:
Total Prepared Foods
Total Foods
c) Percent Foods Prepared by Someone Else:
Total Foods Prepared by
Someone Else
* 100=
%
Total Foods
d) Percent Unprocessed/Unprepared Foods:
Total
Unprocessed/Unprepared
Foods
Total Foods
* 100=
%
e) Summary:
Write a short review of what you have learned about your diet in Part I. It must be at least 200 words
long.
Part II. Reading Food Labels.
1) Select one processed foods from your Assignment 1 food record that contains more than five
ingredients. If you did not eat a processed food with more than five ingredients, select one that was
not on your food record. Fill in the Nutrition Facts Label below for that product.
Name of Food item: _______________________________________
Nutrition Facts
Serving Size:
Servings per Container:
Amount per Serving:
Calories
Amount
% Daily
Value
Total Fat (g)
Saturated Fat (g)
Trans Fat (g)
Cholesterol (mg)
Sodium (mg)
Total Carbohydrate (g)
Dietary Fiber (g)
Sugars (g)
Protein (g)
Vitamin A
Calcium
Iron
2) List the ingredients.
3) Which ingredients are food additives? What is their function? (If you need more lines, then hit the
tab button on at the end of the last line.)
Here are several resources that may help you figure out the function:

https://www.fda.gov/food/ingredientspackaginglabeling/foodadditivesingredients/ucm091
048.htm


https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/List_of_food_additives
http://nutritiondata.self.com/topics/food-additives
Food Additives
Function
4) Does your product make any nutrient claims? If so, which one? You can use this source to help you
or your textbook. The file is also available under Resources, Week 4.
http://www.clemson.edu/extension/hgic/food/nutrition/nutrition/dietary_guide/hgic4061.html
5) Summarize what you have learned. It must be at least 200 words long.
Part III. Carbohydrate and Lipid Content of Your Diet
1) Carbohydrate Content
What type of carbohydrate did you eat? In the table below, list the foods you ate from your diet
analysis in Assignment 1, then to identify the kind of carbohydrate each food contains. Remember,
there are simple and complex carbohydrates present in your diet. Use your textbook for guidance
on the types of sweetener present in the foods you ate and to help you to determine the kind of
carbohydrate, for example, glucose, fructose, etc. A food item may contain more than one type of
carbohydrate. This website can provide some guidance too:
https://www.nal.usda.gov/fnic/nutritive-and-nonnutritive-sweetener-resources
(If you need more lines, then hit the tab button on your computer keyboard at the end of the table’s
last line.)
Food Item
Type of Carbohydrate
2) Lipid Content
What type of lipid did you eat? In the table below, list the foods you ate from your diet analysis in
Assignment 1, then identify the type of lipid each food contains. Use your textbook to help guide
you. A particular food may include more than one kind of fat. (If you need more lines, then hit the
tab button on your computer keyboard at the end of the table’s last line.)
Food Item
Type of Lipid
3) Summarize what you learned below in Part III. It must be 200 words long.

My Eating Feedback
Food Groups
Your results are based on the food choices you made on 2019-02-09. To get a better picture of your usual eating habits, repeat eaTracker on several
different days.
My intake
(number of Food Guide Servings)
Recommended* Number
of Food Guide Servings
Vegetables and Fruit
1
7
Grain Products
4
6
Milk and Alternatives
0
2
Meat and Alternatives
0.5
2
Food Group
* Based on Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide. The recommended number of Food Guide Servings is an average amount that you should aim for
each day. You may need a bit more or less depending on your energy needs.
To learn more about each food group click on the name of the food group in the chart above.
An important step towards better health and a healthy body weight is to follow Canada’s Food Guide by:
Œ
Œ
Œ
Eating the recommended amount and type of food each day.
Including a small amount – 30 to 45 mL (2 to 3 Tbsp) – of unsaturated fat each day.
Limiting foods and beverages that are high in calories, fat, sugar or salt (sodium). This includes cakes, pastries, cookies, granola bars,
doughnuts, muffins, ice cream, frozen desserts, chocolate, candies, french fries, potato chips, nachos and other salty snacks. This also
includes fruit flavoured drinks, soft drinks, sports and energy drinks, sweetened hot or cold drinks and alcohol.
Helpful links
Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide – Health Canada
Nutri-eSCREEN – Over 50? Try this tool from EatRight Ontario – Dietitians of Canada
Healthy Eating Factsheets – Dietitians of Canada
Healthy Eating – Health Canada
Food Portions Toolkit – EatRight Ontario
Take Action
Use eaTracker to set your goals and track your progress.
If you need help achieving your healthy eating goals consult a Registered Dietitian.
For additional tips, tools and great recipes to help you eat well visit the Dietitians of Canada website at www.dietitians.ca.
My Eating Feedback
Nutrients
Your results are based on the food choices you made on 2019-02-09. To get a better picture of your usual eating habits, repeat eaTracker on several
different days.
My Nutrient Feedback compared to Recommended Daily Intakes
Nutrient
Units
My intake from food
My intake from food
and supplements
Your recommended
daily intake
Calories
kcal
1014
1014
2604
Fat
g
34.0
34.0
57.9 – 101.3
Saturated Fat
g
7.3
7.3

Trans Fat
g
0.0
0.0

Cholesterol
mg
154.3
154.3

Sodium
mg
2603.5
2603.5
1500
Potassium
mg
711.7
711.7
4700
Carbohydrate
g
114.4
114.4
293.0 – 423.2
Fibre
g
7.7
7.7
25
Sugars
g
31.9
31.9

Protein
g
24.7
24.7
65.1 – 227.8
Vitamin A
RAE
132.9
132.9
700
Vitamin C
mg
15.9
15.9
75
Calcium
mg
200.5
200.5
1000
Iron
mg
5.6
5.6
18
Vitamin D
mcg
0.2
0.2
15
Vitamin E
mg
1.5
1.5
15
Thiamin
mg
0.6
0.6
1.1
Riboflavin
mg
0.7
0.7
1.1
Niacin
NE
13.4
13.4
14
Folate
DFE
179.3
179.3
400
Vitamin B6
mg
0.5
0.5
1.3
Vitamin B12
mcg
0.7
0.7
2.4
* Saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol – should be as low as possible while consuming a nutritionally adequate diet.
** Sugars – no recommendation for daily intake
1. Nutrient data for foods is from the Canadian Nutrient File, Health Canada, 2010.
2. Supplements selected from your food search.
3. Recommended Daily Intakes are based on Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) published from 1997 to 2005 for all nutrients except calcium and vitamin D which were updated in
2010. National Academy of Sciences. Institute of Medicine. Food and Nutrition Board.
4. Estimated Energy Requirements (EER) are based on your age, weight, height, and activity level and whether pregnant or breastfeeding. National Academy of Sciences. Institute
of Medicine. Food and Nutrition Board.
Nutrients Feedback
The recommended daily intakes are set to meet or exceed the needs of most healthy individuals.
If your intake is the same or higher than the recommended amount, then it is probably adequate. There are no proven benefits to consuming more
than the recommended amounts. With sodium, in particular, it is best to find ways to reduce intake.
If your intake is below the recommended amount on this day that doesn’t necessarily mean you are not meeting your needs on an ongoing basis.
To get a better picture of your usual eating habits, repeat eaTracker on several different days.
For most people, eating a variety of foods from the 4 food groups of Canada’s Food Guide will provide the necessary nutrients, however vitamin and
mineral supplements are recommended in some situations. For example, women of childbearing age and people over the age of 50 will need
certain supplements.
Large amounts of some supplements may be harmful, so only take the recommended amounts.
Learn more about supplements from Dietitians of Canada factsheets.
Calories and key nutrients by meal
Quantity
Units
Total
Breakfast
Bacon, cooked, pan-fried
2
slice(s) cooked
Lettuce, iceberg, raw
2
medium leaf(leaves)
Salad dressing, mayonnaise, regular
1
tsp(s)
Tomato, red, ripe, raw, year round average
2
Water, municipal
8
Turkey breast, smoked, fat free
Water, municipal
Margarita
Carbs
(g)
Fibre
(g)
Sodium
(mg)
1014
25
34
114
8
2603
120
6
10
1
0
418
84
6
6
0
0
384
0
0
0
0
2
0
4
0
0
26
ml chopped or sliced
0
0
0
0
0
0
oz
0
0
0
0
0
7
0
0
0
0
0
0
643
18
22
88
6
1842
muffin(s) (7cm x 8.8cm dia)
433
8
12
72
5
740
0.5
cup(s)
179
3
10
14
2
661
3
slice(s)
31
6
0
1
0
427
0
0
0
0
0
14
2
16
oz
251
1
2
26
1
344
0.5
cup(s)
107
1
1
22
1
34
cocktail(s)
145
0
0
3
0
310
Snacks (all)
Dessert, frozen, sherbet, orange
Fat
(g)
2
Dinner
Potato salad
Protein
(g)
33
Lunch
Muffin, corn, commercial
Calories
(kcal)
1
Take Action
Use eaTracker to set your goals and track your progress.
If you need help achieving your healthy eating goals consult a Registered Dietitian.
For additional tips, tools and great recipes to help you eat well visit the Dietitians of Canada website at www.dietitians.ca
My Eating Feedback
Calories
Your results are based on the food and activity choices you made on 2019-02-09. To get a better picture of your usual eating habits, repeat eaTracker on
several different days.
Calorie Intake
My calorie (energy) intake: 1014 kcal
Your Estimated Energy Requirements (EER): 2604 kcal
The Estimated Energy Requirement (EER) is an estimate of the number of calories you need in a day to maintain your current weight.
It is based on your age, gender, weight, height, and whether you are pregnant or breastfeeding; and also on the activity level you selected in your
profile.
Calories from protein, fat, carbohydrates and alcohol
My Intake (Grams)
My Intake (%)
Recommended Intake as a
Percent of Total Calories
Protein
25
10
10-35%
Fat
34
31
20-35% for adults
25-35% for 14 to 18 year olds
Carbohydrate
114
45
45-65%
Nutrients
Approximately 14% of your energy (calories) comes from alcohol. Alcohol can provide significant extra calories to your day. Alcohol is not an essential part
of healthy eating, it adds calories but no other nutrients.
Calories and key nutrients by meal
Quantity
Units
Total
Breakfast
Bacon, cooked, pan-fried
2
slice(s) cooked
Lettuce, iceberg, raw
2
medium leaf(leaves)
Salad dressing, mayonnaise, regular
1
tsp(s)
Tomato, red, ripe, raw, year round average
2
Water, municipal
8
Calories
(kcal)
Protein
(g)
Fat
(g)
Carbs
(g)
Fibre
(g)
Sodium
(mg)
1014
25
34
114
8
2603
120
6
10
1
0
418
84
6
6
0
0
384
2
0
0
0
0
2
33
0
4
0
0
26
ml chopped or sliced
0
0
0
0
0
0
oz
0
0
0
0
0
7
Lunch
0
0
0
0
0
0
Dinner
643
18
22
88
6
1842
muffin(s) (7cm x 8.8cm dia)
433
8
12
72
5
740
0.5
cup(s)
179
3
10
14
2
661
3
slice(s)
31
6
0
1
0
427
Muffin, corn, commercial
Potato salad
Turkey breast, smoked, fat free
Water, municipal
2
16
oz
0
0
0
0
0
14
251
1
2
26
1
344
cup(s)
107
1
1
22
1
34
cocktail(s)
145
0
0
3
0
310
Snacks (all)
Dessert, frozen, sherbet, orange
Margarita
0.5
1
Energy Balance
Your body weight should stay the same if the calories from your food and beverages balance the calories you use for daily living and additional
physical activities.
Today you had fewer calories than you need to maintain your current weight.
If you always have less calories than your EER or if you increase your daily activity level from what you reported in your My Detailspage, you will likely
lose weight.
If you become more or less active than when you started eaTracker you may want to go back to the My Details area to change your activity level. Your
estimated energy requirement (EER) is based on the activity level you selected.
How can you achieve a healthy weight?
Eating well and keeping active every day is an important way to help you achieve a healthy weight.
Check your body mass index (BMI) and waist circumference (WC) to see if you have a healthy body weight.
If you are trying to achieve a weight loss goal, you may want to increase the number of calories you burn by 500 calories per day or eat 500 calories
less each day or do a combination of both to achieve a weight loss of about a pound a week. A pound of fat stores about 3500 calories.
Related Links:
Weight Management Factsheets – Dietitians of Canada
Physical Activity Guidelines – Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology
Take Action
Use eaTracker to set your goals and track your progress.
If you need help achieving your healthy eating or weight goals consult a Registered Dietitian.
If you need help becoming more active consult a CSEP Certified Exercise Physiologist® or a CSEP Certified Personal Trainer®.
For additional tips, tools and great recipes to help you eat well visit the Dietitians of Canada website at www.dietitians.ca.

My Eating Feedback
Food Groups
Your results are based on the food choices you made on 2019-02-10. To get a better picture of your usual eating habits, repeat eaTracker on several
different days.
My intake
(number of Food Guide Servings)
Recommended* Number
of Food Guide Servings
Vegetables and Fruit
5
7
Grain Products
4
6
Milk and Alternatives
1
2
Meat and Alternatives
0.5
2
Food Group
* Based on Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide. The recommended number of Food Guide Servings is an average amount that you should aim for
each day. You may need a bit more or less depending on your energy needs.
To learn more about each food group click on the name of the food group in the chart above.
An important step towards better health and a healthy body weight is to follow Canada’s Food Guide by:
Œ
Œ
Œ
Eating the recommended amount and type of food each day.
Including a small amount – 30 to 45 mL (2 to 3 Tbsp) – of unsaturated fat each day.
Limiting foods and beverages that are high in calories, fat, sugar or salt (sodium). This includes cakes, pastries, cookies, granola bars,
doughnuts, muffins, ice cream, frozen desserts, chocolate, candies, french fries, potato chips, nachos and other salty snacks. This also
includes fruit flavoured drinks, soft drinks, sports and energy drinks, sweetened hot or cold drinks and alcohol.
Helpful links
Eating Well with Canada’s Food Guide – Health Canada
Nutri-eSCREEN – Over 50? Try this tool from EatRight Ontario – Dietitians of Canada
Healthy Eating Factsheets – Dietitians of Canada
Healthy Eating – Health Canada
Food Portions Toolkit – EatRight Ontario
Take Action
Use eaTracker to set your goals and track your progress.
If you need help achieving your healthy eating goals consult a Registered Dietitian.
For additional tips, tools and great recipes to help you eat well visit the Dietitians of Canada website at www.dietitians.ca.
My Eating Feedback
Nutrients
Your results are based on the food choices you made on 2019-02-10. To get a better picture of your usual eating habits, repeat eaTracker on several
different days.
My Nutrient Feedback compared to Recommended Daily Intakes
Nutrient
Units
My intake from food
My intake from food
and supplements
Your recommended
daily intake
Calories
kcal
1284
1284
2604
Fat
g
31.0
31.0
57.9 – 101.3
Saturated Fat
g
10.8
10.8

Trans Fat
g
0.1
0.1

Cholesterol
mg
84.0
84.0

Sodium
mg
3907.4
3907.4
1500
Potassium
mg
1913.7
1913.7
4700
Carbohydrate
g
208.6
208.6
293.0 – 423.2
Fibre
g
12.6
12.6
25
Sugars
g
80.4
80.4

Protein
g
52.3
52.3
65.1 – 227.8
Vitamin A
RAE
259.8
259.8
700
Vitamin C
mg
191.3
191.3
75
Calcium
mg
674.7
674.7
1000
Iron
mg
11.3
11.3
18
Vitamin D
mcg
3.3
3.3
15
Vitamin E
mg
7.7
7.7
15
Thiamin
mg
1.0
1.0
1.1
Riboflavin
mg
1.3
1.3
1.1
Niacin
NE
20.9
20.9
14
Folate
DFE
460.4
460.4
400
Vitamin B6
mg
0.9
0.9
1.3
Vitamin B12
mcg
24.8
24.8
2.4
* Saturated fat, trans fat, cholesterol – should be as low as possible while consuming a nutritionally adequate diet.
** Sugars – no recommendation for daily intake
1. Nutrient data for foods is from the Canadian Nutrient File, Health Canada, 2010.
2. Supplements selected from your food search.
3. Recommended Daily Intakes are based on Dietary Reference Intakes (DRIs) published from 1997 to 2005 for all nutrients except calcium and vitamin D which were updated in
2010. National Academy of Sciences. Institute of Medicine. Food and Nutrition Board.
4. Estimated Energy Requirements (EER) are based on your age, weight, height, and activity level and whether pregnant or breastfeeding. National Academy of Sciences. Institute
of Medicine. Food and Nutrition Board.
Nutrients Feedback
The recommended daily intakes are set to meet or exceed the needs of most healthy individuals.
If your intake is the same or higher than the recommended amount, then it is probably adequate. There are no proven benefits to consuming more
than the recommended amounts. With sodium, in particular, it is best to find ways to reduce intake.
If your intake is below the recommended amount on this day that doesn’t necessarily mean you are not meeting your needs on an ongoing basis.
To get a better picture of your usual eating habits, repeat eaTracker on several different days.
For most people, eating a variety of foods from the 4 food groups of Canada’s Food Guide will provide the necessary nutrients, however vitamin and
mineral supplements are recommended in some situations. For example, women of childbearing age and people over the age of 50 will need
certain supplements.
Large amounts of some supplements may be harmful, so only take the recommended amounts.
Learn more about supplements from Dietitians of Canada factsheets.
Calories and key nutrients by meal
Calories
(kcal)
Protein
(g)
Fat
(g)
Carbs
(g)
Fibre
(g)
Sodium
(mg)
Total
1284
52
31
209
13
3907
Breakfast
630
21
16
107
3
1100
246
9
2
50
2
290
Quantity
Bagel, cinnamon-raisin
Units
1
bagel(s)
Cheese, cream
3
tsp(s)
50
1
5
1
0
47
Cranberry juice, unsweetened
16
oz
209
2
1
55
0
9
Turkey bacon, cooked
3
slice(s)
126
10
9
1
0
754
Lunch
0
0
0
0
0
0
Dinner
546
29
14
75
5
2806
Bread, Italian
2
slice(s) (35g)
190
6
2
35
2
409
So …
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