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Take this topic and this documentation/information and make an elaborate (22 slide/Or More!!) power point. Have a voice/ tone. Include the Researchers and writers (who its by/ credit)Team Leader: Erin MckinnonResearchers are: Astina Sampadian, Kyndal Cooper, Tinh VanWriters: Sonya Pulley, Jenna MorelandInclude the references/work cited page at the end .
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Table of Contents
Title: More than 100 arrested in sex trafficking, prostitution operation in Polk County, including Orlando
VA doctor …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 2
Title: Orlando 3rd in nation for human-trafficking calls ……………………………………………………………………. 4
Title: Human Trafficking ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7
What is Human Trafficking? ………………………………………………………………………………………………… 7
Statistics ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 7
How to help…………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 7
Title: Human Trafficking: UCF Faculty, Alumni Combat the Epidemic …………………………………………………. 8
Title: Florida ……………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………… 17
Florida …………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17
VIEW STATS BY STATE ……………………………………………………………………………………………………….. 17
LOOKING FOR A REFERRAL? ………………………………………………………………………………………………. 17
Sex Trafficking in Orlando, FL
1) Purpose – To define sex trafficking and educate the reader on who sex trafficking effects.
Communicate current state of the US and Orlando as it pertains to sex trafficking. To identify
possible initiatives to augment the current efforts.
2) Introduction
a) Define “Sex Trafficking”.
b) What is sex trafficking?
c) Who does it effect?
3) Current Statistics
a) What are the national statistics?
b) What are the Orlando statistics?
c) What are the Florida statistics?
4) Current Initiatives
a) What are the current initiatives?
i) Outreach programs?
ii) Government Funding?
iii) Media Campaigns?
b) How well are they working?
i) Which is working best?
ii) Which does not seem to make a difference?
5) Recommended Initiatives
a) What other steps could they take?
b) What kind of success do you think you would see with these steps?
6) Conclusion
*******************************************************************
Recent News Articles:
Source: Orlando Sentinel
Author: Kate Santich
Title: More than 100 arrested in sex trafficking, prostitution operation in Polk County, including
Orlando VA doctor
Date: December 3, 2018 2:10PM
URL: https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/breaking-news/os-ne-sex-trafficking-ring-100-arrestedpolk-county-20181203-story.html
Article Text:
Outline Section 4.b.i – Undercover detectives have arrested 103 people in an alleged prostitution
and human trafficking operation in Polk County that may involve minors, the sheriff’s office
announced Monday.
The arrests took place during a six-day investigation, the sheriff’s office said. Among those
arrested was Dr. Sarat Sabharwal, 54, identified by the sheriff’s office as a urologist for the
Orlando VA Medical Center and an on-call trauma surgeon.
He was charged with soliciting a prostitute. An Orlando VA spokeswoman said the doctor would
not see patients while officials there propose “appropriate administrative action.”
The undercover operation began Nov. 27 and focused on online advertisements — both by
alleged prostitutes and men allegedly seeking prostitutes. Charges include human trafficking,
soliciting another for prostitution, offering to commit prostitution, deriving support from
proceeds of prostitution, transporting to a building for prostitution and using a communication
device to commit a felony.
Three of the people arrested for prostitution are possible victims of human trafficking, and one of
them is believed to be a minor, a sheriff’s public information officer said.
In all, 56 people were arrested on charges of advertising prostitution online, and 30 people were
arrested for allegedly soliciting undercover detectives who posted ads posing as prostitutes, the
sheriff’s office said. Eleven others were charged with deriving proceeds from prostitution, and
six were taken into custody for drug charges and other offenses.
Authorities are still searching for 49-year-old William Welch, who allegedly drove to Polk
County believing he was going to have sex with a 14-year-old girl. Welch is facing several
charges, including traveling to meet a minor, using a computer to solicit a child and attempted
lewd battery.
“We conduct these kinds of investigations because of the link between prostitution, human
trafficking, drug crimes, economic crimes — such as burglary and fraud — and violent crime,”
said Polk County Sheriff Grady Judd. “Prostitution is not a victimless crime. From the spread of
disease, destruction of families, and to the scourge of human trafficking, prostitution is bad for
our community.”
Detectives worked closely with One More Child and the Florida Department of Children and
Families during the operation, the sheriff’s office said.
During the operation, undercover detectives posted fictitious ads or profiles on various social
media platforms, websites and mobile-phone applications, posing as prostitutes or those
soliciting prostitutes. (Santich, More than 100 arrested in sex trafficking, prostitution operation
in Polk County, including Orlando VA doctor, 2018)
Source: Orlando Sentinel
Author: Kate Santich
Title: Orlando 3rd in nation for human-trafficking calls
Date: September 28, 2017 5:55PM
URL: https://www.orlandosentinel.com/news/os-orlando-third-nationally-human-trafficking-20170927story.html
Article Text:
Outline Section 3.b – Greater Orlando ranks third in the United States for the number of reports
to the national human-trafficking hotline, Central Florida leaders announced Thursday — a
statistic they said indicated a growing awareness of the problem in a vulnerable community.
“Because of our tourism, because we are transient, because we are growing rapidly, it makes us a
community where this type of exploitation is more likely to happen,” said Tomas Lares, founder
and executive director of Florida Abolitionist, the regional nonprofit organization devoted to
eradicating the problem. “Too often, we don’t know our neighbors, so a house where people are
kept for trafficking is more likely to escape notice.”
Outline Section 4.a.i – His remarks came as officials announced recent progress in the fight
against the crime — including approval by Orange County commissioners earlier this month to
spend nearly $2 million over the next 2½ years to staff the state’s first crisis shelter for humantrafficking victims. Under the agreement, Aspire Health Partners — a major provider of mentalhealth care and addiction treatment — will provide therapy and round-the-clock care while
Florida Abolitionist will handle intake.
“When we receive a call at midnight … having a place to take victims immediately is imperative
to helping them be safe,” said Lares, who noted that currently there are few good options. “This
will be parallel to what Harbor House has done for Florida for victims of domestic violence.”
Winter Park nanny missing ‘under suspicious circumstances,’ police say »
Outline Section 4.a.i – Orange County Commissioner Pete Clarke said the shelter will provide 10
beds to start but could be expanded. The undisclosed location should open late this year or early
next year, he said.
Outline Section 3.b – In 2016, state officials received nearly 1,900 calls of suspected trafficking
of children and teens to its Department of Children and Families hotline, Lares said. In addition,
the National Human Trafficking Hotline reported this month that Orlando had 790 complaints of
adults being trafficked from December 2007 to December 2016.
I’ve been a victim of horrific, unspeakable violence. Sometimes I can’t believe I’m
standing here.— Diana Bolívar, who was held in captivity for two years as a child in
Colombia.
In sheer numbers, that puts Orlando at 20th in the nation. But based on population size, the city
ranks third — behind Washington, D.C., and Atlanta and ahead of Miami, Las Vegas,
Sacramento and St. Louis, Mo.
Outline Section 4.a.iii – Lares attributes the statistic in part to greater awareness. A growing
number of hotels and restaurants post the hotline number — 1-888-373-7888 — for victims and
witnesses, and local law enforcement officers have been educated on warning signs of the crime,
which largely remains hidden.
“As a father, human trafficking has affected my own household,” said Aaron Maners, Florida
Abolitionist’s chief operating officer. One of his daughters was trafficked after running away at
age 18. She is now in recovery but not ready to speak publicly, he said.
In Orlando, many of the victims are female and are exploited sexually. But across the state, labor
trafficking is believed to be a larger problem, particularly in rural areas where people are
enslaved to do agricultural work, Lares said.
Others are made personal or domestic slaves.
A woman in her late 40s identified only as “Lisa” said she was rescued from her trafficker in
2014 when a SWAT team broke down the door of the Orlando home where she and a group of
girls forced into prostitution were being held.
Man charged with human trafficking, forced teen to pick blueberries, deputies say »
“He was a sociopath,” she said. “I went with him when I was 42 and already addicted to drugs,
and he used heroin and opiates to reward us for doing what he wanted. I wasn’t good at
prostitution, so he made me … his slave. He broke me down. He took my heart, my mind, my
soul.”
After five years in captivity, she had to work through a drug treatment program before starting to
rebuild her life at Samaritan Village, a transitional home for survivors.
“Today I’m doing good,” she said. “I’m just learning to love again — finally.”
The message of hope is an essential one, said Diana Bolívar, a Florida Abolitionist supporter,
consultant and the past president of the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce of Metro Orlando.
As a child in Colombia, she was held in captivity for over two years by people who duped her
parents into thinking they were caretakers. She was abused, starved and chained, she said. After
she was rescued, she came to the United States — where, at age 15, she was attacked by a serial
rapist who tried to kidnap her.
“I’ve been a victim of horrific, unspeakable violence,” she said. “Sometimes I can’t believe I’m
standing here. But I’m not bitter. I’m strong. I love life. I love people. And I believe there are
more good people in this world than bad.” (Santich, Orlando 3rd in nation for human-trafficking
calls, 2017)
Source: Florida Health (floridahealth.gov)
Author: Florida Department of Health, Office of Communications
Title: Human Trafficking
Date: December 05, 2018
URL: http://www.floridahealth.gov/programs-and-services/prevention/human-trafficking/index.html
Article Text:
The Florida Department of Health is taking a public health approach to combatting
human trafficking. Given the diverse populations the Department serves, there is great
potential for victims of human trafficking to come into contact with the Department. The
Department is committed to moving from awareness to action in its efforts to eradicate
human trafficking in Florida.
What is Human Trafficking?
Outline Section 2.a – Human Trafficking is the recruitment, harboring, transporting,
providing or obtaining, by any means, a person for labor or services involving forced
labor, slavery or servitude in any industry, such as forced or coerced participation in
agriculture, prostitution, manufacturing, or other industries or in domestic service or
marriage (Freedom Network, based on the federal criminal law definitions of trafficking).
Statistics
Outline Section 3.a – Estimates in the U.S. exceed 14,500–17,500 annually, of which 80 percent are
women and children. Globally, the numbers range from 600,000 to 4 million people who are
trafficked worldwide each year (United Nations).
How to help
Children and adults can be victims of human trafficking. “If you see something, say something.”




If you have information regarding suspected Human Trafficking of a child in Florida contact:
Florida Abuse Hotline 1-800-96-ABUSE (1-800-962-2873).
If you have information regarding suspected Human Trafficking of an adult anywhere in the
United States or of a child outside of Florida please contact:
National Human Trafficking Resource Center 1-888-373-7888.
Text HELP to 233733 (BEFREE): To get help for victims and surviviors of human trafficking or
to connect with local services.
Visit the National Human Trafficking Hotline online at: https://humantraffickinghotline.org.
(Florida Department of Health, 2018)
Source: UCF Today
Author: Camille Dolan
Title: Human Trafficking: UCF Faculty, Alumni Combat the Epidemic
Date: January 22, 2018
URL: https://today.ucf.edu/human-trafficking-how-ucf-faculty-alumni-are-combatting-the-epidemic/
Article Text:
Although the term “human trafficking” is relatively new, the phenomena it comprises—
sex trafficking, forced labor and debt bondage—have been around for nearly as long as
civilization itself.
Outline Section 2.a The United Nations defines human trafficking as “the recruitment,
transportation, transfer, harboring or receipt of persons by improper means (such as
force, abduction, fraud or coercion) for an improper purpose including forced labor or
sexual exploitation.”
The dispassionate definition of human trafficking does not take into account the terrible
and myriad ways that traffickers conduct their business. In October, the Polk County
Sheriff’s Office conducted a week-long undercover sting targeting human trafficking and
online prostitution that culminated in 277 arrests that included doctors, pharmacists and
active and retired law enforcement officers.
Also in that month, the FBI, along with the National Center for Missing and Exploited
Children, recovered 84 children and arrested 120 suspected traffickers as part of a
nationwide initiative to combat sex trafficking in minors. In the sting, traffickers offered a
3-month-old baby and a 5-year-old girl to undercover officers for $600.
Human trafficking has continued to grow largely unchecked, mostly due to its global
economy estimated at more than $150 billion of untaxed profit a year, according to the
International Labour Organization. The investigation and prosecution of those who
benefit from human trafficking, as well as the rescue of its many victims, naturally
are prime areas of concern for local, state and federal law enforcement.
In observance of Human Trafficking Awareness Month, UCF is spotlighting 11 UCF
alumni and faculty who are helping to fight the growing crimes of forced labor and
sexual exploitation.
Investigating Human Trafficking in Central Florida
If you think that Orlando is immune to human trafficking, you’d be wrong.
“Once you know what you’re looking for, it’s not hard to find,” says Courtney Harrison
’06, a Florida Department of Law Enforcement employee who specializes in human
trafficking and child-exploitation investigations.
Like any metropolitan area, Orange County has its fair share of challenging areas to
police. It has historically been an area of concern. It is also where Harrison spent five
years as a deputy and was exposed to the world of human trafficking, which has
inspired her career trajectory.
Outline Section 4.a.iii In her career, Harrison has played an active role in more than 500
arrests related to prostitution and human trafficking. She and some of her colleagues
will soon be featured working a human-trafficking case on the CBS network’s 48 Hours.
“Human trafficking is not new — it’s been around for some time,” Harrison says. “But
thankfully, people are now paying more attention to this growing issue.”
Victims are Often Overlooked
When Dave Allmond ’88 was a newly sworn beat cop with Orlando Police Department,
he noticed that he encountered many prostitutes during his shift. Allmond, currently a
sergeant with OPD and a supervisor with the MBI, said that although the adage of, “If
you see something, say something,” still applies, “You need to know what you’re
seeing.”
Often marginalized and unnoticed, the population fell into a group he calls, “one of those
dirty little secrets.” A group that, like drug users or the homeless, most people — unless
they are researching the issue or advocating for its victims — tend to overlook.
“Prostitution is more of a problem than we are aware of,” says Allmond, who has been a
vice agent for five years.
He became aware of “females exploiting females” and other evidence of “behind-thescenes coercion.” But the tide is shifting. Prostitution is now considered sex trafficking,
transcending racial and socioeconomic barriers. In a city famous for its theme parks,
thousands of hotel rooms and travelers of all types, it is a tale as old as time. Predator
versus prey.
Allmond said that recent cases his team at the MBI have worked include a man who
recently purchased a minor for a weekend and was charged with human trafficking. In
another case, a young woman who had been accepted into an Ivy League college was
rescued from her trafficker.
It’s important to note that victims of human trafficking are not always eager to be
rescued, Allmond says. “They don’t say, ‘Oh, thank God, the police are here!’”
‘Human Trafficking is Slavery’
Within minutes, a trafficker can post a suggestive picture and contact information on
multiple websites, and have potential “clients” willing to pay. However, almost as quickly
as the advertisement is posted, people like Kaila Williams ’16 are tracking their
location via sophisticated software.
Outline Section 4.a.ii – Williams is a crime intelligence analyst for the State Attorney’s Office
in the Ninth Judicial Circuit and is assigned to the MBI. She looks for patterns and
trends within possible human trafficking rings, and assists agents locating suspects and
victims. Most of her work occurs behind the scenes, Williams says, but occasionally she
goes into the field with sworn officers.
“In my short time being here it is heartbreaking to see how often trafficking occurs,”
Williams says. “The public needs to know that this is not one of those problems that only
occurs in third-world countries. This is a first-world problem, a second-world problem
and a third-world problem. Human trafficking is slavery.”
Cycle of Violence can be Broken
Ron Stucker ’96 is the director of the MBI, and is all too familiar with the “cycles of
exploitation” faced by the victims of human trafficking.
“The victims are subjected to degradation and abuse for others’ profit and gratification,”
Stucker says.
“Agents, victim specialists and analysts assigned to the Metropolitan Bureau of
Investigation work tirelessly to assist victims and help restore them to meaningful and
productive lives, while bringing their traffickers to justice. They are dedicated
professionals who believe the victims have value and the cycle of violence can be
broken.”
‘We’re Competing Against the Pimps’
Ashley Oramas ’11 is a victim specialist for the State Attorney’s Office in the Ninth
Judicial Circuit. She is also assigned to the MBI …
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